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Experimentally induced infections of European eel Anguilla anguilla with Anguillicola crassus (Nematoda, Dracunculoidea) and subsequent migration of larvae
Haenen, O.L.M.; Grisez, L.; De Charleroy, D.; Belpaire, C.; Ollevier, F.P. (1989). Experimentally induced infections of European eel Anguilla anguilla with Anguillicola crassus (Nematoda, Dracunculoidea) and subsequent migration of larvae. Dis. Aquat. Org. 7: 97-101
In: Diseases of Aquatic Organisms. Inter Research/Inter-Research: Amelinghausen. ISSN 0177-5103, more
Peer reviewed article

Also published as
  • Haenen, O.L.M.; Grisez, L.; De Charleroy, D.; Belpaire, C.; Ollevier, F.P. (1990). Experimentally induced infections of European eel Anguilla anguilla with Anguillicola crassus (Nematoda, Dracunculoidea) and subsequent migration of larvae, in: (1990). IZWO Coll. Rep. 20(1990). IZWO Collected Reprints, 20: pp. chapter 9, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 3029 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Larvae; Life cycle; Pathology; Anguilla anguilla (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Anguillicola crassus Kuwahara, Niimi & Itagaki, 1974 [WoRMS]; Marine; Brackish water; Fresh water

Authors  Top 
  • Haenen, O.L.M.
  • Grisez, L.
  • De Charleroy, D., more
  • Belpaire, C., more
  • Ollevier, F.P., more

Abstract
    Migration patterns of third-stage Anguillicola crassus larvae, and pathogenesis of the lesions induced by third-stage larvae, was investigated in European eel Anguilla anguilla L. Young elvers (1g) were fed infected Paracyclops fimbriatus (Copepoda). Eel samples were collected and examined histologically at varying intervals during 6 mo post-infection period. Third-stage larvae (L-III) migrated directly through the intestinal wall and body cavity to the swimbladder within 17h post-infection. L-IV larvae were detected 3 mo post-infection, and immature adults were detected within 4 mo post-infection. The parasites occasionally showed aberrant migration paths. Pathological effects caused by the parasite were less severe after experimentally induced infections than those detected in some natural infections.

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