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Effects of storage temperature and duration on the setting and post-set spat survival of the tropical oyster, Crassostrea iredalei ( Faustino)
Devakie, M.N.; Ali, A.B. (2000). Effects of storage temperature and duration on the setting and post-set spat survival of the tropical oyster, Crassostrea iredalei ( Faustino). Aquaculture 190: 369-376
In: Aquaculture. Elsevier: Amsterdam; London; New York; Oxford; Tokyo. ISSN 0044-8486, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Devakie, M.N.
  • Ali, A.B.

Abstract
    The effects of six storage temperatures (5°C, 10°C, 15°C, 20°C, 25°C and room temperature) and six storage durations (6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h) on pre-settlement larvae of Crassostrea iredalei indicated that settlement rate deteriorated with time for all temperatures. The highest settlement rate (40.1%) was attained at a storage temperature of 20°C for 6 h. This was followed by 10°C and 15°C for 6 h, with mean percent sets of 35.4% and 33.5%, respectively. An above-average set of 29.5% was obtained for the control larvae (larvae directly from the rearing tanks) compared to larvae stored between 10°C and 20°C for 12 to 24 h (21.1-28.2%). Average sets obtained for storage between 10°C and 20°C was 16.6-19.7% for up to 48 h, and sets for room temperature (ca. 30°C) and 5°C for 12 h were 11.9% and 16.9%, respectively; whereas at 25°C the set rate was 10.7% for 6 h. Storage at all other levels of temperature and duration resulted in poor set rates of less than 8%. All successfully set larvae from this experiment were further kept in the hatchery for three weeks to observe their short-term post-settlement survival. Survival rates were closely related to the setting rates, whereby higher sets contributed to better survival rates. The highest survival rates, 61.3-84.8%, were recorded for larvae set at temperatures ranging from 10°C to 20°C with a storage time of up to 48 h. These levels were comparable to the control (68.0%) and 5°C for up to 12 h (68.9%). Storage at 72 h resulted in total mortality at all temperatures, except for those stored at of 10°C (51.5% survival) and 20°C (14.7%).

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