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Reproduction of hatchery-reared and transplanted wild bay scallops, Argopecten irradians irradians, relative to natural populations
Tettelbach, S.T.; Smith, C.F.; Wenczel, P.; Decort, E. (2002). Reproduction of hatchery-reared and transplanted wild bay scallops, Argopecten irradians irradians, relative to natural populations. Aquacult. Int. 10(4): 279-296
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Aquaculture; Argopecten; Reproduction; Scallop culture; Scallops; Scallops; Seedlings; Argopecten irradians irradians (Lamarck, 1819) [WoRMS]

Authors  Top 
  • Tettelbach, S.T., correspondent
  • Smith, C.F.
  • Wenczel, P.
  • Decort, E.

Abstract
    Efforts to restore bay scallop populations in the United States through transplantation of wild stock and reseeding of hatchery-reared individuals have increased due to declines in natural populations, yet little is known of the comparative spawning patterns and relative reproductive investment of these different groups. In this study, spawning patterns of wild scallops from a source population in Northwest Harbor, New York and of scallops transplanted to a distant site in the same embayment (Flanders Bay) were similar. Hatchery-reared scallops held in pearl nets in Hallock Bay, New York showed the same temporal spawning pattern and level of reproductive investment as scallops from adjacent wild populations and wild scallops held in pearl nets. We suggest that hatchery-reared scallops may be equally valuable as potential broodstock for reseeding operations as wild scallops of the same size, provided that appropriate conditioning and rearing practices are maintained. Both wild and hatchery-reared scallops may be transplanted a short period (i.e. 2-4 weeks) prior to expected spawning to provide a source of potential broodstock in areas where natural population densities are low.

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