Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

In:

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
report an error in this recordbasket (1): add | show Printer-friendly version

one publication added to basket [33783]
Regeneration status of mangrove forests in Mida Creek, Kenya: a compromised or secured future?
Kairo, J.G.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Gwada, P.O.; Ochieng, C.; Koedam, N. (2002). Regeneration status of mangrove forests in Mida Creek, Kenya: a compromised or secured future? Ambio 31(7-8): 562-568
In: Ambio. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences: Stockholm. ISSN 0044-7447, more
Peer reviewed article

Also published as
  • Kairo, J.G.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Gwada, P.O.; Ochieng, C.; Koedam, N. (2002). Regeneration status of mangrove forests in Mida Creek, Kenya: a compromised or secured future?, in: (2002). VLIZ Coll. Rep. 32(2002). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 32: pp. chapter 25, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 97847 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Mangroves; Plant control; Regeneration; ISW, Kenya, Mida Creek [gazetteer]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Kairo, J.G., more
  • Dahdouh-Guebas, F., more
  • Gwada, P.O.
  • Ochieng, C.
  • Koedam, N., more

Abstract
    The structure and regeneration patterns of Mida Creek mangrove vegetation were studied along belt transects at 2 forest sites of Mida Creek (3°20'S, 40°00'E): Uyombo and Kirepwe. Based on the species importance values, the dominant mangrove tree species in Mida were Ceriops tagal (Perr.) C. B. Robinson and Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. Tree density varied from 1197 trees ha-1 at Kirepwe to 1585 trees ha-1 at Uyombo and mean tree height was higher at the former site compared to the latter. The size-class structure at both localities of Mida showed the presence of more small trees than large ones. Spatial distribution pattern of adults and juveniles varied greatly between sites and they showed a close to uniform pattern (Morisita’s Index 10 << 1) for trees, but a tendency to random distribution (10 = 1) for juveniles. The present paper shows that unmanaged but exploited mangroves do not necessarily disappear, but change qualitatively from locally preferred R. mucronata to the less preferred C. tagal. Whereas the effects of this change on the ecological function of the mangrove cannot be estimated yet, the economical function of the mangrove has evidently weakened.

 Top | Authors