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Symmetrical convergent bedload sand transport pattern associated with headlands: a preliminary indication from bedforms, sediment distribution and bathymetry
Bastos, A.C.; Kenyon, N.H.; Collins, M.B. (2000). Symmetrical convergent bedload sand transport pattern associated with headlands: a preliminary indication from bedforms, sediment distribution and bathymetry, in: Trentesaux, A. et al. (Ed.) Marine Sandwave Dynamics, International Workshop, March 23-24 2000, University of Lille 1, France. Proceedings.
In: Trentesaux, A.; Garlan, T. (Ed.) (2000). Marine Sandwave Dynamics, International Workshop, March 23-24 2000, University of Lille 1, France. Proceedings. Université de Lille 1: Lille. ISBN 2-11-088263-8. 240 pp., more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Bastos, A.C.
  • Kenyon, N.H.
  • Collins, M.B.

Abstract
    Bathymetric, hydrodynamic and side-scan sonar data were reviewed in order to investigate the continental shelf sedimentary processes associated with a headland. The headland considered is the Isle of Portland (Dorset southern UK), where tidally-induced residual eddies are identified and used to explain the existence of a notable bank only on one side of the headland (Shambles Bank) (Pingree, 1978). A preliminary interpretation reveals that, in fact, there is a complex suite of bedforms, including sand banks and sand shoals, on both sides of the headland, with a fairly symmetrical distribution. The existence of this suite of bedforms appears to be associated with net bedload convergent transport patterns, on both sides of the headland. Instead of residual circulation, the transient nature of the flow during the tidal cycle (transient eddies), should be controlling the bedload transport patterns, and, as a consequence, the formation and maintenance of the sedimentary deposits. Part of the little asymmetry of the deposits, including morphology, is due to the greater influence of waves on the west side of the headland.

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