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Acute and acclimated digestive responses of the cockle Cerastoderma edule (L.) to changes in food quality and quantity: I. Feeding and absorption of biochemical components
Ibarrola, I.; Navarro, E.; Urrutia, M.B. (2000). Acute and acclimated digestive responses of the cockle Cerastoderma edule (L.) to changes in food quality and quantity: I. Feeding and absorption of biochemical components. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol. 252: 181-198
In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. Elsevier: New York. ISSN 0022-0981, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Ibarrola, I.
  • Navarro, E.
  • Urrutia, M.B.

Abstract
    Cockles Cerastoderma edule were fed two different concentrations ( ~ 0.8 and 2 mm3 1-1) of two diets with different qualities ( ~ 10 and 60% of organic content) which were achieved by mixing different proportions of ashed silt particles with cells of the microalgae Tetraselmis suecica. Clearance, ingestion and absorption rates of organic matter and biochemical components were measured after 3 days (acute response) and 11 days (acclimated response) of exposure to the diets. With low quality diets cockles were found to reject part of the filtered matter ( ~ 25-35%) through pseudofaeces production both in the acute and acclimated responses. In the acute response, absorption rate of organic matter was positively dependent on food quality and quantity, but the physiological response to increasing food concentrations differed with food quality: with low qualities, increasing absorption rate resulted from the simultaneous increase of clearance ( ~ 2 times) and ingestion rate ( ~ 4 times) as well as absorption efficiency of organic matter ( ~ 22%). However, those fed high qualities, were found to compensate increasing food concentration by reducing ( ~ 50%) clearance rate. The resulting moderate increase of ingestion rate ( ~ 1.6 times) was accompanied with a reduction in absorption efficiency ( ~ 20%). Irrespective of food quality and quantity, protein and lipids were absorbed, respectively, with the highest (from 61.7 to 80.0%) and the lowest (from 42.6 to 66.8%) efficiency. Acclimated response was entirely affected by food quality: with low qualities, cockles greatly improved the energetic intake from available ration ( ~ 4 and 2 times, with low and high food concentrations, respectively). Both preingestive and digestive mechanisms were involved in this response: at the preingestive level, clearance rate and preingestive selection efficiency were significantly increased. At the digestive level, cockles were capable of maintaining absorption efficiency of organic matter with rising ingestion rate. On the contrary, acclimation to high quality diets brought about no significant increase in organic absorption rate: with low ration, clearance rate was kept constant, whereas with high ration the increase in clearance and ingestion rate ( ~ 2 times) promoted a compensatory reduction in absorption efficiency. However, the biochemical composition of the absorbed matter was found to be absolutely modified, both at low and high food rations, due to an strong reduction of lipid absorption efficiency. The observed modifications of absorption rate and/ or the biochemical composition of the absorbed matter suggests the capability of cockles to adjust the digestive performance.

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