IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Gill pathology caused by infestations of adult and preadult Dissonus manteri Kabata (Copepoda: Dissonidae) on coral trout, Plectropomus leopardus (Lacépède), (Serranidae)
Bennett, S.M.; Bennett, M.B. (2001). Gill pathology caused by infestations of adult and preadult Dissonus manteri Kabata (Copepoda: Dissonidae) on coral trout, Plectropomus leopardus (Lacépède), (Serranidae). J. Fish Dis. 24: 523-533
In: Journal of Fish Diseases. Blackwell Science: Oxford; London; Edinburgh; Boston; Melbourne. ISSN 0140-7775, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Bennett, S.M.
  • Bennett, M.B.

Abstract
    Adult and preadult Dissonus manteri attached to the gills of Plectropomus leopardus cause significant pathology in the form of large hyperplastic nodules on the afferent (leading) edges of gill filaments. Nodules result from the dual actions of parasite attachment and feeding. The host response is characterized by severe epithelial hyperplasia, supplemented by fibroplasia and inflammation. Parasites attach close to the gill arch near the base of filaments. They have little effect on gill vasculature as the maxillipeds penetrate the filament superficial to the efferent filament artery and do not interfere with the blood vessels of the secondary lamellae. Tissue proliferation is limited to the wide portion of filament “edge'” epithelium in the proximal third and also does not extend to the secondary lamellae. Nodules are most numerous towards the ends of hemibranchs and are generally absent from the central regions. Leading hemibranchs bear significantly more nodules than their trailing counterparts. Of the total number of nodules, 20.5% are located on the pseudobranchs. Distribution patterns are considered to be primarily the result of D. manteri avoiding strong water currents, although this cannot explain the difference between numbers on leading and trailing hemibranchs.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors