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An inexpensive turbidimeter for the automatic culturing of filter feeders
Versichele, D.; Bossuyt, E.; Sorgeloos, P. (1979). An inexpensive turbidimeter for the automatic culturing of filter feeders, in: Styczynska-Jurewicz, E. et al. (Ed.) Cultivation of fish fry and its live food: proceedings of a conference held at Szymbark (Poland) September 1977. Special Publication European Mariculture Society, 4: pp. 415-422
In: Styczynska-Jurewicz, E. et al. (Ed.) (1979). Cultivation of fish fry and its live food: proceedings of a conference held at Szymbark (Poland) September 1977. Special Publication European Mariculture Society, 4. European Mariculture Society: Bredene, Belgium. 534 pp., more
In: Special Publication European Mariculture Society. European Mariculture Society: Bredene. ISSN 0772-2710, more

Also published as
  • Versichele, D.; Bossuyt, E.; Sorgeloos, P. (1980). An inexpensive turbidimeter for the automatic culturing of filter feeders, in: IZWO Coll. Rep. 10(1980). IZWO Collected Reprints, 10: pp. chapter 7, more

Available in Authors 
  • VLIZ: Proceedings [3625]
  • VLIZ: Open Repository 126233 [ OMA ]
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Aquaculture techniques; Filter feeders; Turbidity sensors; Marine; Brackish water; Fresh water

Authors  Top 
  • Versichele, D.
  • Bossuyt, E.
  • Sorgeloos, P., more

Abstract
    Automatization in the food distribution is necessary for the controlled culturing of filter feeders in high densities. Numerous devices have been described to distribute specific quantities of food suspension at preset time intervals (cf. review in Kinne, 1977). The number of systems which, however, add food whenever a preset critical turbidity of the medium is exceeded are rather limited. They furthermore are either very expensive (sophisticated equipment) or have to be cleaned very often (cf. review in Sorgeloos et al., 1976). We tried to simplify the technological complexity of the existing systems and developed an inexpensive, automatic, self cleaning food distributor. This apparatus measures the turbidity of the culturing medium which is pumped into a glass syringe, at regular time intervals. When a preset optical density is reached, the food distribution system is activated.

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