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Bioaccumulation of trace metals in the Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri (Stebbing, 1906): comparison of two-compartment and hyperbolic toxicokinetic models
Clason, B.; Duquesne, S.; Liess, M.; Schulz, R.; Zauke, G.-P. (2003). Bioaccumulation of trace metals in the Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri (Stebbing, 1906): comparison of two-compartment and hyperbolic toxicokinetic models. Aquat. Toxicol. 65(2): 117-140
In: Aquatic Toxicology. Elsevier Science: Tokyo; New York; London; Amsterdam. ISSN 0166-445X, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Antarctic; Heavy metals; Kinetics; Life history; Models; Toxicity tests; Toxicology; Ultraviolet radiation; Amphipoda [WoRMS]; Paramoera walkeri (Stebbing, 1906) [WoRMS]; PS, Antarctica [Marine Regions]; PSE, Australia [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Clason, B.
  • Duquesne, S.
  • Liess, M.
  • Schulz, R.
  • Zauke, G.-P., correspondent

Abstract
    Bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn in the Antarctic gammaridean amphipod Paramoera walkeri (Stebbing, 1906) was investigated at Casey station (Australian Antarctic Territory). The main goals were to provide information on accumulation strategies of the organisms tested and to verify toxicokinetic models as a predictive tool. The organisms accumulated metals upon exposure and it was possible to estimate significant model parameters of two-compartment and hyperbolic models. These models were successfully verified in a second toxicokinetic study. However, the application of hyperbolic models appears to be more promising as a predictive tool for metals in amphipods compared to compartment models, which have failed to adequately predict metal accumulation in experiments with increasing external exposures in previous studies. The following kinetic bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for the theoretical equilibrium were determined: 150-630 (Cd), 1600-7000 (Pb), 1700-3800 (Cu) and 670-2400 (Zn). We find decreasing BCFs with increasing external metal dosing but similar results for treatments with and without natural UV radiation and for the combined effect of different exposure regimes (single versus multiple metal exposure) and/or the amphipod collective involved (Beall versus Denison Island). A tentative estimation showed the following sequence of sensitivity of P. walkeri to an increase of soluble metal exposure: 0.2-3.0 μg Cd l-1, 0.12-0.25 μg Pb l-1, 0.9-3.0 μg Cu l-1 and 9-26 μg Zn l-1. Thus, the amphipod investigated proved to be more sensitive as biomonitor compared to gammarids from German coastal waters (with the exception of Cd) and to copepods from the Weddell Sea inferred from literature data.

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