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Alteration of microbial community composition and changes in decomposition associated with an invasive intertidal macrophyte
Hahn, D.R. (2003). Alteration of microbial community composition and changes in decomposition associated with an invasive intertidal macrophyte. Biological Invasions 5(1-2): 45-51
In: Biological Invasions. Springer: London. ISSN 1387-3547, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Hahn, D.R. (2003). Alteration of microbial community composition and changes in decomposition associated with an invasive intertidal macrophyte, in: Pederson, J. Marine bioinvasions: patterns, processes and perspectives. : pp. 45-51, more

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Keywords
    Degradation; Invasions; Sea grass; Zostera (Zosterella) japonica Ascherson & Graebner, 1907 [WoRMS]; Zostera (Zostera) marina Linnaeus, 1753 [WoRMS]; INE, USA, Washington, Padilla Bay [Marine Regions]; Marine

Author  Top 
  • Hahn, D.R.

Abstract
    Data demonstrating the effects of biological invaders on microbial communities and microbial processes are scarce, especially in marine environments. Research was conducted at Padilla Bay, Washington, to examine the effect that an invasive intertidal eelgrass, Zostera japonica Aschers & Graebn, has on rates of decomposition, microbial community composition, and the possible implications for associated ecosystem processes in this estuarine environment. A series of observational and experimental studies were conducted in beds of Z. japonica, beds of its native congener, Zostera marina, and mixed eelgrass beds. These studies assessed decomposition of invasive and native eelgrass, enumerated bacterial abundance, and examined sole source carbon usage (SSCU) by microbial assemblages. Z. japonica decomposed more rapidly than its native congener throughout the study period although rates of decomposition were variable. Microbial abundance did not differ among different vegetation compositions although differences in SSCU by microbial assemblages were detected among beds of invasive, native, and mixed eelgrass. These results indicate that this abundant invasive species can accelerate rates of decomposition and alter the associative decomposer community, which may lead to higher carbon and nutrient turnover within Padilla Bay.

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