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Ovigerous-hair stripping substance (OHSS) in an estuarine crab: purification, preliminary characterization, and appearance of the activity in the developing embryos
Saigusa, M.; Iwasaki, H. (1999). Ovigerous-hair stripping substance (OHSS) in an estuarine crab: purification, preliminary characterization, and appearance of the activity in the developing embryos. Biol. Bull. 197(2): 174-187. hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1542613
In: Biological Bulletin. Marine Biological Laboratory: Lancaster. ISSN 0006-3185, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Saigusa, M.
  • Iwasaki, H.

Abstract
    Ovigerous-hair stripping substance (OHSS) is an active factor in crab hatch water (i.e., filtered medium into which zoea larvae have been released). This factor participates in stripping off the egg attachment structures (i.e., egg case, funiculus, and the coat investing ovigerous hairs) that remain attached to the female's ovigerous hairs after larval release. Thus this activity prepares the hairs for the next clutch of embryos. OHSS activity of an estuarine crab, Sesarma haematocheir, eluted as a single peak on molecular-sieve chromatography, but this peak still showed two protein bands at 32 kDa and 30 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The two protein bands stained with a polyclonal antiserum raised to the active fractions from molecular-sieve chromatography. Moreover, antibodies purified from this polyclonal OHSS antiserum also recognized both the 32-kDa and 30-kDa bands. OHSS immunoreactivity and biological activity were associated with the attachment structures that remained connected to the ovigerous hairs after hatching. In developing embryos, both protein bands could be stained immunochemically at least 10 days before hatching. But OHSS biological activity appeared only 3 days before hatching. The immunoreactive protein bands were not observed in the zoea, but OHSS bioreactivity was present, though greatly reduced. The 32-kDa protein, at least, is probably an active OHSS, and the 30-kDa protein band may also be OHSS-related. The OHSS appears to be produced and stored by the developing embryo. Upon hatching, most of the material may be trapped by the remnant structures, and the remainder is released into the ambient water.

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