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Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) producing cells in the brain of sex changing fish
Elofsson, U.O.E.; Winberg, S.; Francis, R.C.; Mayer, I.; Nilsson, G.E. (2000). Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) producing cells in the brain of sex changing fish, in: Norberg, B. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish, Bergen, Norway, July 4-9, 1999. pp. 50-52
In: Norberg, B. et al. (Ed.) (2000). Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish, Bergen, Norway, July 4-9, 1999. Department of Fisheries and Marine Biology, University of Bergen: Bergen. ISBN 82-7461-048-2. 499 pp., more
In: International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish. Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, more

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [4118]

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Elofsson, U.O.E.
  • Winberg, S.
  • Francis, R.C.
  • Mayer, I.
  • Nilsson, G.E.

Abstract
    The known and proposed functions of the brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) system in reproductive endocrine pathways and behaviour makes it a likely key component in the process of socially induced post-maturational sex change. In the present study, the distribution of brain GnRH-immunoreactive (GnRH-ir) neurones was examined in some sex changing teleost species. The effects of gender, maturational state and gonadal androgens on GnRH-ir cell number and size were addressed. The results indicate that a long-term increase/decrease in preoptic area GnRH-ir cell number is part of a masculinization/demasculinization mechanism in female-to-male/male-to-female sex changing fish, and that a short-term change in GnRH-ir cell size is coupled to the seasonal spawning cycle. They further imply that gonadal androgens not are responsible for this plasticity in GnRH-ir neurones.

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