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Sexual plasticity of behavior and gonadotropin secretion in goldfish and gynogenetic crucian carp
Kobayashi, M.; Stacey, N.E.; Aida, K.; Watabe, S. (2000). Sexual plasticity of behavior and gonadotropin secretion in goldfish and gynogenetic crucian carp, in: Norberg, B. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish, Bergen, Norway, July 4-9, 1999. pp. 117-124
In: Norberg, B. et al. (Ed.) (2000). Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish, Bergen, Norway, July 4-9, 1999. Department of Fisheries and Marine Biology, University of Bergen: Bergen. ISBN 82-7461-048-2. 499 pp., more
In: International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish. Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [4160]

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Kobayashi, M.
  • Stacey, N.E.
  • Aida, K.
  • Watabe, S.

Abstract
    Goldfish, Carassius auratus, a non-sex changing (gonochoristic) fish, exhibits gender-typical reproductive functions (behavior and GTH secretion). Heterotypical (opposite gender) behaviors do not normally occur, but can be induced in adults by hormone treatments which do not inhibit the ability to perform homotypical behaviors. Male-typical behavior also can be induced without defeminization by androgen treatment in gynogenetic Japanese crucian carp, Carassius auratus langsdorfii, which evolved as an all-female population. Androgen treatment can also induce male-typical GTH secretion in female goldfish and crucian carp. Such sexual plasticity is also observed in hermaphroditic (sex changing) teleosts which exhibit reproductive functions of both sexes during their lifetime. Results of goldfish and crucian carp studies, and the existence of naturally occurring hermaphroditism, suggest that teleosts, regardless of their reproductive strategy (hermaphroditism, gonochorism, or gynogenesis), may commonly possess a sexually bipotential brain.

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