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Aquaculture in Norway
Hansen, T.; Stefansson, S.O.; Taranger, G.L.; Norberg, B. (2000). Aquaculture in Norway, in: Norberg, B. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish, Bergen, Norway, July 4-9, 1999. pp. 408-411
In: Norberg, B. et al. (Ed.) (2000). Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish, Bergen, Norway, July 4-9, 1999. Department of Fisheries and Marine Biology, University of Bergen: Bergen. ISBN 82-7461-048-2. 499 pp., more
In: International Symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fish. Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [4328]

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Hansen, T.
  • Stefansson, S.O.
  • Taranger, G.L.
  • Norberg, B.

Abstract
    The Norwegian aquaculture production will in 1999 exceed 420.000 tons. Of these, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) make up close to 98% with production volumes of 370.000 and 45.000 tons respectively. Arctic charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) is another salmonid that are established in a niche market with small volumes (400 tons). During the last years the salmonid industry has shown an annual increase of 8-9% per year. The Norwegian production constitute 50% of the world production of Atlantic salmon. Commercial aquaculture of marine finfish is still at a small scale. Rearing methods for halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) and wolffish (Anarhichas spp.) are being developed. In 1998, 250 tons of farmed halibut were produced, but further research and development are required in order to enable full scale commercial production. Rearing techniques for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are available, but commercial aquaculture has been limited (500 tons) by a low market price due to large landings of wild fish. Also small quantities (125 tons) of Turbot (Scoptalamus maximus) is produced in heated waste water from the metallurgic industry.

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