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Thermal resistance, developmental rate and heat shock proteins in Artemia franciscana, from San Francisco Bay and southern Vietnam
Clegg, J.S.; Jackson, S.A.; Van Hoa, N.; Sorgeloos, P. (2000). Thermal resistance, developmental rate and heat shock proteins in Artemia franciscana, from San Francisco Bay and southern Vietnam. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol. 252(1): 85-96. dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-0981(00)00239-2
In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. Elsevier: New York. ISSN 0022-0981, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Clegg, J.S.; Jackson, S.A.; Van Hoa, N.; Sorgeloos, P. (2000). Thermal resistance, developmental rate and heat shock proteins in Artemia franciscana, from San Francisco Bay and southern Vietnam, in: VLIZ Coll. Rep. 30(2000). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 30: pp. chapter 8, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 55322 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Adaptations; Biological development; Cysts; Growth rate; Temperature effects; Temperature tolerance; Zooplankton; Artemia Leach, 1819 [WoRMS]; Artemia franciscana Kellog, 1906 [WoRMS]; Indo-Pacific North East [Marine Regions]; USA, California [Marine Regions]; Marine
Author keywords
    Artemia; heat resistance; induced thermotolerance; heat shock; Hsp70; P26; artemin

Authors  Top 
  • Clegg, J.S.
  • Jackson, S.A.
  • Van Hoa, N.
  • Sorgeloos, P., more

Abstract
    Cysts (encysted gastrula embryos) of Artemia franciscana collected from salterns in San Francisco Bay, California, USA (SF) were inoculated into much warmer growth ponds in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam (V) in 1996. V adults arising directly from these cysts during 17 April to 15 May produced their own cysts, which were collected, processed and stored until shipped to the USA for study. Adults grown in the laboratory from SF cysts (those used for the inoculation) were less resistant to high temperature than adults cultured from V cysts. V cysts produced heat-resistant adults, even though cultured under the same laboratory conditions as SF animals, at much lower temperatures than they ever experienced in Vietnam. Differences in thermal performance between SF and V adults were retained in the second generation, cultured from cysts produced in ther laboratory by first generation adults, suggesting a genetic basis for the better heat resistance of V adults. We propose that the operation of natural selection in the Vietnam growth ponds produced adults with improved thermal tolerance, and that the basis for this tolerance was incorporated into the developmental program of their cysts. Surprisingly, differences in heat resistance of laboratory reared animals were not reflected in constitutive levels of the hsp70 family which were similar in first generation SF and V adults. A conditioning heat shock (HS, 37°C, 30 min) led to the same level of induced thermotolerance in SF and V first generation adults when evaluated 24 h post-HS. Levels of hsp70 were also up-regulated at that time, but to about the same extent in SF and V adults. Developmental rates of SF cysts used for the inoculation were faster than those of cysts produced in Vietnam when both were incubated at 21+/-1°C, suggesting that V cysts have become adapted to develop at higher temperatures.

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