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Tanzania
Guard, M.; Mmochi, A.J.; Horrill, C. (2000). Tanzania, in: Sheppard, C.R.C. (Ed.) Seas at the millennium: an environmental evaluation: 2. Regional chapters: The Indian Ocean to The Pacific. pp. 83-98
In: Sheppard, C.R.C. (Ed.) (2000). Seas at the millennium: an environmental evaluation: 2. Regional chapters: The Indian Ocean to The Pacific. Pergamon: Amsterdam. ISBN 0-08-043207-7. XXI, 920 pp., more

Available in  Authors 
Document type: Review

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Guard, M.
  • Mmochi, A.J.
  • Horrill, C.

Abstract
    The coastal zone of Tanzania contains a wealth of coastal and marine habitats that include coastal and mangrove forest, extensive coral reefs, seagrass, algae and sponge beds, large intertidal areas, coastal plains and sandy beaches. Sustaining a diverse array of plant and animal life, these habitats provide important sources of protein, livelihood, building materials and tourism potential for coastal and inland rural communities. Yet with increasing pressure from a rapidly rising population, continued over-exploitation, habitat degradation and urban pollution, these habitats are becoming degraded and the coastal human communities now face a serious threat to their food supplies. There is also a threat to the ability to alleviate poverty or to improve health or community development. Exacerbated by a lack of awareness, poor licensing systems, poor data collection and ineffective regulation, it is clear that a huge effort is required to successfully address and counter these problems. Institutions such as the University of Dar Es Salaam, the Institute of Marine Sciences, Zanzibar, NGOs and several overseas donor agencies are now working together in an attempt to develop and implement Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) in Tanzania. Recent initiatives to help build local and institutional capacity , develop local community marine management and prevent illegal and destructive extraction practices (such as dynamite fishing) have met with varying success but are nonetheless positive steps towards this goal.

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