IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Feeding experiments with Mytilus edulis L. at small laboratory scale: 3. Feeding of waste organic products from the fish industry of Bremerhaven as a means of recycling biodegradable wastes
Murken, J. (1976). Feeding experiments with Mytilus edulis L. at small laboratory scale: 3. Feeding of waste organic products from the fish industry of Bremerhaven as a means of recycling biodegradable wastes, in: Persoone, G. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 10th European Symposium on Marine Biology, Ostend, Belgium, Sept. 17-23, 1975: 1. Research in mariculture at laboratory- and pilot scale. pp. 273-284
In: Persoone, G.; Jaspers, E. (Ed.) (1976). Proceedings of the 10th European Symposium on Marine Biology, Ostend, Belgium, Sept. 17-23, 1975: 1. Research in mariculture at laboratory- and pilot scale. IZWO: Wetteren. ISBN 90-6281-001-2. 620 pp., more

Available in Author 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [4812]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Author  Top 
  • Murken, J.

Abstract
    At a discontinuous feeding regime (six constant additions of food suspension at 4 hr intervals/day), 700 mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) from the Weser Estuary (FRG) were fed with different amounts of pure fish-waste water (fish debris and dissolved organic material) and with several combinations of waste water, algal suspension and suspended silt. After a feeding period of 60 days, all mussels fed exclusively with fish-waste showed a high decrease in dry-tissue weight and a relatively high mortality. With a mixture of waste water and suspended silt, the initial dry-tissue weight was kept more or less constant. An increase of 32.9 % was observed by feeding a mixture of waste water and algal culture. The highest increase in dry-tissue weight (169.4 %) could be obtained by a combination of waste water, algal culture and suspended silt. From these experiments it is obvious that suspended silt must play an important role in digestion and utilization of animal debris. It appears possible to supply the maintenance requirements of mussels by feeding such kinds of animal debris with an addition of suspended silt. Growth, however, could not be obtained without an addition of living unicellular algae. The high increase in dry-tissue weight, obtained by a combination of waste water, algal suspension and suspended silt, indicates that animal debris may play an important role as a supplemental food for mussels.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Author