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Development of crustacean aquaculture
Shleser, R.A. (1976). Development of crustacean aquaculture, in: Persoone, G. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 10th European Symposium on Marine Biology, Ostend, Belgium, Sept. 17-23, 1975: 1. Research in mariculture at laboratory- and pilot scale. pp. 455-471
In: Persoone, G.; Jaspers, E. (Ed.) (1976). Proceedings of the 10th European Symposium on Marine Biology, Ostend, Belgium, Sept. 17-23, 1975: 1. Research in mariculture at laboratory- and pilot scale. IZWO: Wetteren. ISBN 90-6281-001-2. 620 pp., more

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    VLIZ: Proceedings [4831]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Author  Top 
  • Shleser, R.A.

Abstract
    The Aquaculture Program of Bodega Marine Laboratory is an interdisciplinary effort directed toward the development of aquaculture technology. The primary area of emphasis is the culture of the American lobster Homarus americanus. Research in the areas of water quality, nutrition, genetics, physiology, pathology, microbiology, algology. engineering and economics, have been integrated to emphasize the understanding of the economics of culture. The presentation will describe how work in each of these areas has resulted in the reduction of the production costs of lobster. Much of the technology developed in the lobster research area has general application to the culture of other species. We are currently investigating the culture of Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), and other crustaceans. Progress with these species will be described. Recent regulations requiring strict control of levels of metabolites in mariculture effluents have led us to investigate the potential of various species of algae to take up ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite. These algae may then serve as food for shellfish such as oysters, clams, scallops, and mussels. The economics of these food chains are discussed.

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