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A review of the effects of some environmental and nutritional factors on brown shrimp, Penaeus aztecus Ives in laboratory cultures
Venkataramiah, A.; Lakshmi, G.J.; Gunter, G. (1976). A review of the effects of some environmental and nutritional factors on brown shrimp, Penaeus aztecus Ives in laboratory cultures, in: Persoone, G. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 10th European Symposium on Marine Biology, Ostend, Belgium, Sept. 17-23, 1975: 1. Research in mariculture at laboratory- and pilot scale. pp. 523-547
In: Persoone, G.; Jaspers, E. (Ed.) (1976). Proceedings of the 10th European Symposium on Marine Biology, Ostend, Belgium, Sept. 17-23, 1975: 1. Research in mariculture at laboratory- and pilot scale. IZWO: Wetteren. ISBN 90-6281-001-2. 620 pp., more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [4837]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Venkataramiah, A.
  • Lakshmi, G.J.
  • Gunter, G.

Abstract
    Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions to determine the environmental and nutritional optima for brown shrimp, Penaeus aztecus. Presumably, the results will be applicable in large-scale culture. The test parameters were selected within the known salinity and temperature ranges of the species in nature. The methods used in growth rate studies are described, including the food types and feeding procedures and the techniques for holding shrimp in the laboratory. Food consumption, conversion efficiency, growth and survival rates were found to be influenced by salinity and temperature interactions. Brown shrimp apparently can be raised on a low protein diet (40 %), in low salinity and normal temperature combinations (8.5 promille-17 promille and 26 °C respectively) which seem to be close to their optima. It was further indicated that a low salinity is essential for fast growth in the postlarvae from an age of 16 days and older. Before that age, the small shrimp prefer higher salinities of the sea from which they came. Acclimation to constant photoperiods apparently disturbs the diurnal rhythm in brown shrimp; but the primarily salinity related behavioral responses are not altered. In identical salinity concentrations, the behavioral responses of brown shrimp such as burying are related to oxygen consumption and growth rate. The implication is that in low salinities, where superior growth occurs, the shrimp live on a low energy budget by burying in greater numbers than in high salinities.

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