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Finding enchytraeid oligochaetes (Clitellata) in hot climates: species occurrence on the shores of Bermuda
Healy, B.; Coates, K.A. (1999). Finding enchytraeid oligochaetes (Clitellata) in hot climates: species occurrence on the shores of Bermuda, in: Healy, B.M. et al. (Ed.) Aquatic Oligochaetes: Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Aquatic Oligochaetes held in Presque Isle, Maine, USA, 18-22 August 1997. Developments in Hydrobiology, 139: pp. 111-117
In: Healy, B.M.; Reynoldson, T.B.; Coates, K.A. (Ed.) (1999). Aquatic Oligochaetes: Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Aquatic Oligochaetes held in Presque Isle, Maine, USA, 18-22 August 1997. Reprinted from Hydrobiologia, vol. 406. Developments in Hydrobiology, 139. Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht. ISBN 0-7923-5954-2. 290 pp., more
In: Dumont, H.J. (Ed.) Developments in Hydrobiology. Kluwer Academic/Springer: The Hague; London; Boston; Dordrecht. ISSN 0167-8418, more

Also published as
  • Healy, B.; Coates, K.A. (1999). Finding enchytraeid oligochaetes (Clitellata) in hot climates: species occurrence on the shores of Bermuda. Hydrobiologia 406: 111-117, more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Healy, B.
  • Coates, K.A.

Abstract
    Sampling of a wide range of intertidal habitats increased the number of marine enchytraeid species for Bermuda from 12 to 31, of which 15 are believed to be new to science. The new species are in the genera Enchytraeus, Achaeta and Marionina, predominantly of the last named genus (12 of 15 species). Probable reasons for the large number of new records are the inclusion of habitats not previously sampled, such as algal cushions on rocks and seawater outfalls from aquaria, as well as the use of a wet funnel extractor. The ecological distribution of the species illustrates their dependence on moisture and a good supply of oxygen and confirms the view that enchytraeids are unable to live in stagnant, wet habitats, in hot climates. Species richness is comparable with that recorded in faunal studies of temperate shores. It is proposed that estimates of enchytraeid species richness in the tropics and subtropics could be much higher if attention were paid to the physiological requirements of these worms when designing sampling programs.

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