IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

The management of insular caribbean mangroves in relation to site location and community type
Bacon, P.R.; Alleng, G.P. (1992). The management of insular caribbean mangroves in relation to site location and community type, in: Jaccarini, V. et al. (Ed.) The Ecology of Mangrove and Related Ecosystems: Proceedings of the International Symposium held at Mombasa, Kenya, 24-30 September 1990. Developments in Hydrobiology, 80: pp. 235-241
In: Jaccarini, V.; Martens, E.E. (Ed.) (1992). The Ecology of Mangrove and Related Ecosystems: Proceedings of the International Symposium held at Mombasa, Kenya, 24-30 September 1990. Reprinted from Hydrobiologia, vol. 247. Developments in Hydrobiology, 80. Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht. ISBN 0-7923-2049-2. 266 pp., more
In: Dumont, H.J. (Ed.) Developments in Hydrobiology. Kluwer Academic/Springer: The Hague; London; Boston; Dordrecht. ISSN 0167-8418, more

Also published as
  • Bacon, P.R.; Alleng, G.P. (1992). The management of insular caribbean mangroves in relation to site location and community type. Hydrobiologia 247: 235-241, more

Available in Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Brackish water

Authors  Top 
  • Bacon, P.R.
  • Alleng, G.P.

Abstract
    Mangrove ecosystems occupy different locations on Caribbean island coasts, ranging from open bays (fringe mangals) to totally enclosed salt ponds and salinas. On geomorphologically active coastlines, such as south Jamaica, systems are at varying degrees of maturity and productivity. Furthermore, because of system variability, the interactions between mangroves and associated marine systems, such as coral reefs and seagrass beds, are developed to different degrees. Community structure and productivity of a range of mangals on different islands of the Greater and Lesser Antilles are discussed. Forcing functions and levels of interaction with the marine environment are identified. The rational choice of management options must be based on the range of goods and services provided by the different systems; and a good understanding of their ecology is essential when choosing sites for protection, waste disposal, landfill, marina development and fisheries enhancement. Examples are given from current studies in Jamaica, St. Lucia, the British Virgin Islands and Trinidad, of a flexible management response to mangrove ecosystem diversity.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors