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The vertical distribution of Chthamalus montagui and Chthamalus stellatus (Crustacea, Cirripedia) in two areas of the NW Mediterranean Sea
Pannacciulli, F.G.; Relini, G. (2000). The vertical distribution of Chthamalus montagui and Chthamalus stellatus (Crustacea, Cirripedia) in two areas of the NW Mediterranean Sea, in: Liebezeit, G. et al. (Ed.) Life at Interfaces and Under Extreme Conditions: Proceedings of the 33rd European Marine Biology Symposium, Wilhelmshaven, Germany, 7-11 September 1998. Hydrobiologia, 426(1-3): pp. 105-112
In: Liebezeit, G.; Dittmann, S.; Kröncke, I. (Ed.) (2000). Life at Interfaces and Under Extreme Conditions: Proceedings of the 33rd European Marine Biology Symposium, Wilhelmshaven, Germany, 7-11 September 1998. Hydrobiologia, 426(1-3). Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht. 210 pp., more
In: Hydrobiologia. Springer: The Hague. ISSN 0018-8158, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Pannacciulli, F.G.; Relini, G. (2000). The vertical distribution of Chthamalus montagui and Chthamalus stellatus (Crustacea, Cirripedia) in two areas of the NW Mediterranean Sea. Hydrobiologia 426: 105-112, more

Available in Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Barnacles; Barnacles; Vertical distribution; Chthamalus montagui Southward, 1976 [WoRMS]; Chthamalus stellatus (Poli, 1791) [WoRMS]; Cirripedia [WoRMS]; MED, Italy, Liguria, Genoa Gulf [Marine Regions]; MED, Trieste Gulf [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Pannacciulli, F.G., more
  • Relini, G.

Abstract
    The Mediterranean Sea is characterised by a small tidal range (0.3-1 m). Despite this, intertidal communities are well established and their upper limits often extend above mean high water level. Organisms living in the intertidal region and in the supralittoral zone rely on both tides and wave action to perform their biological functions. Lack of food, desiccation and predation are common stresses in such a harsh environment. The present study deals with the vertical distribution of two species of intertidal barnacles, Chthamalus montagui Southward and Chthamalus stellatus (Poli), which are the main constituents of the barnacle belt along Mediterranean rocky shores. Previous work, carried out in the Atlantic, showed that where the distribution ranges of the two Chthamalus species overlap, C. montagui is more common in the upper barnacle zone while C. stellatus is dominant lower down. The main aims of our study are: (1) to establish if there is a relationship between position and extension of the barnacle belt on the shore and tidal range and/or wave exposure, (2) to test the hypothesis that in the study areas C. montagui is more abundant than C. stellatus high on the shore, and that the pattern is reversed lower down. Barnacle populations were monitored in summer 1998 in the Gulf of Genoa (Ligurian Sea) and in the Gulf of Trieste (North-Adriatic Sea). The two areas differ in tidal range and hydrodynamism, the former presenting quite strong wave action and a tidal range of 30 cm, the latter having limited wave action and 1 m tidal range. Three shores were randomly selected in each gulf and two transects on each shore. Counts of barnacles in 10 * 10 cm quadrats were done at different shore heights along each transect. The data was subjected to analysis of variance. Results showed that a more pronounced hydrodynamic regime corresponded to a shift of the barnacle belt towards the higher shore (Gulf of Genoa), while in more sheltered areas (Gulf of Trieste), the barnacle distribution was confined to the intertidal region. The relative spatial distribution of C. montagui and C. stellatus within the barnacle belt varied locally, even between transects on the same shore, and this obscured the distribution pattern along the vertical gradient. Nevertheless, it was still possible to conclude that at mid and high shore in Genoa, C. stellatus was more abundant than C. montagui, while in Trieste the pattern was reversed.

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