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Roosts of black-headed gulls : key of a self-organized dispersal system
De Schutter, G.; Nuyts, E. (1993). Roosts of black-headed gulls : key of a self-organized dispersal system, in: Chardon, M. et al. (Ed.) Third Belgian Congress of Zoology, 5-6 November 1993. Belgian Journal of Zoology, 123(Suppl. 1): pp. 20
In: Chardon, M.; Goffinet, G. (Ed.) (1993). Third Belgian Congress of Zoology, 5-6 November 1993. Belgian Journal of Zoology, 123(Suppl. 1). University of Liège: Liège. 109 pp., more
In: Belgian Journal of Zoology. Koninklijke Belgische Vereniging voor Dierkunde = Société royale zoologique de Belgique: Gent. ISSN 0777-6276, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • De Schutter, G.; Nuyts, E. (1993). Roosts of black-headed gulls : key of a self-organized dispersal system. Belg. J. Zool. 123(Suppl. 1): 20, more

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Document types: Conference paper; Summary

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • De Schutter, G.
  • Nuyts, E.

Abstract
    Self organizing principle suggests that very simple interactions between numerous agents lead to very sophisticated adaptive behaviours on the hole system of these interacting agents. Self-organization has been evidenced as the leading principle of several adaptive mass behaviour in social animals, most I y social insects. Here we construct a model based on field observations and experiments on the social behaviours of wintering black-headed gulls, particularly roosting behaviour. This model leads from the simple rules structuring flocks of gulls till the complex adaptive system regulating the daily distribution of lens of thousands of them over wide areas. These simple rules will be linked to this complexity through spatial structure of daily moves and nocturnal roosting behaviours. This model is both an illustration of the self-organizing principle as a mean of regulating bird dispersal and a new hypothesis about the function of communal roosting behaviour in birds.

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