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Use of Continuous Plankton Recorder information in support of marine management: applications in fisheries, environmental protection, and in the study of ecosystem response to environmental change
Brander, K.M.; Dickson, R.R.; Edwards, M. (2003). Use of Continuous Plankton Recorder information in support of marine management: applications in fisheries, environmental protection, and in the study of ecosystem response to environmental change, in: Reid, P.C. et al. (Ed.) Achievements of the Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey and a vision for its future. Progress in Oceanography, 58(2-4): pp. 175-191. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pocean.2003.08.003
In: Reid, P.C.; Matthews, J.B.L.; Smith, M.A. (Ed.) (2003). Achievements of the Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey and a vision for its future. Progress in Oceanography, 58(2-4). Elsevier: Amsterdam. 115-358 pp., more
In: Progress in Oceanography. Pergamon: Oxford,New York,. ISSN 0079-6611, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Brander, K.M.; Dickson, R.R.; Edwards, M. (2003). Use of Continuous Plankton Recorder information in support of marine management: applications in fisheries, environmental protection, and in the study of ecosystem response to environmental change. Prog. Oceanogr. 58(2-4): 175-191. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pocean.2003.08.003, more

Available in Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Biodiversity; Climatic changes; Eutrophication; Fishery management; Long-term planning; Ocean policy; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Brander, K.M.
  • Dickson, R.R.
  • Edwards, M., more

Abstract
    The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey was conceived from the outset as a programme of applied research designed to assist the fishing industry. Its survival and continuing vigour after 70 years is a testament to its utility, which has been achieved in spite of great changes in our understanding of the marine environment and in our concerns over how to manage it. The CPR has been superseded in several respects by other technologies, such as acoustics and remote sensing, but it continues to provide unrivalled seasonal and geographic information about a wide range of zooplankton and phytoplankton taxa. The value of this coverage increases with time and provides the basis for placing recent observations into the context of long-term, large-scale variability and thus suggesting what the causes are likely to be. Information from the CPR is used extensively in judging environmental impacts and producing quality status reports (QSR); it has shown the distributions of fish stocks, which had not previously been exploited; it has pointed to the extent of ungrazed phytoplankton production in the North Atlantic, which was a vital element in establishing the importance of carbon sequestration by phytoplankton. The CPR continues to be the principal source of large-scale, long-term information about the plankton ecosystem of the North Atlantic. It has recently provided extensive information about the biodiversity of the plankton and about the distribution of introduced species. It serves as a valuable example for the design of future monitoring of the marine environment and it has been essential to the design and implementation of most North Atlantic plankton research.

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