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Horizontal and vertical distribution patterns, retention rates, and population dynamics of zooplankton on Western Bank, Scotian Shelf
Reiss, C.S.; McLaren, I.A.; Avendaño, P. (2003). Horizontal and vertical distribution patterns, retention rates, and population dynamics of zooplankton on Western Bank, Scotian Shelf. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 60(10): 1229-1244
In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences = Journal canadien des sciences halieutiques et aquatiques. National Research Council Canada: Ottawa. ISSN 0706-652X, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Abundance; Ichthyoplankton; Population dynamics; Vertical distribution; Zooplankton

Authors  Top 
  • Reiss, C.S.
  • McLaren, I.A.
  • Avendaño, P.

Abstract
    We assess the importance of retention rates and local production to the concentration of zooplankton on Western Bank, Scotian Shelf, during September and October 1998. We do so using (i) particle retention rates derived from an array of 25 current meters and inferences from hydrographic structure; (ii) observations on the horizontal and vertical distribution of zooplankton and ichthyoplankton; and (iii) a simple projection-matrix model of the population dynamics of two copepod species, Centropages typicus and Pseudocalanus spp. Zooplankton biomass and adult stages of copepods were more abundant in surface waters on the bank (p < 0.05) at broad (25 km) spatial scales. Zooplankton was correlated with ichthyoplankton abundance at this scale (r > 0.5, p < 0.001), a result of local production of both zooplankton and fish on the bank. The time-dependent anticyclonic circulation around Western Bank was variable, and particle retention rates were 18 and 33% for 20 days at 12.5 and 28.5 m, respectively. The population model showed that both C. typicus and Pseudocalanus spp. are capable of increasing their population size despite advective loss and mortality rates approaching 10%·day-1. We conclude that local production exceeding advective loss rates can explain the high concentrations of zooplankton on Western Bank.

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