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Diurnal, horizontal and vertical dispersal of kelp-associated fauna
Jørgensen, N.M.; Christie, H.C. (2003). Diurnal, horizontal and vertical dispersal of kelp-associated fauna. Hydrobiologia 503: 69-76
In: Hydrobiologia. Springer: The Hague. ISSN 0018-8158, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Jørgensen, N.M.; Christie, H.C. (2003). Diurnal, horizontal and vertical dispersal of kelp-associated fauna, in: Jones, M.B. et al. (Ed.) Migrations and Dispersal of Marine Organisms: Proceedings of the 37th European Marine Biology Symposium held in Reykjavik, Iceland, 5-9 August 2002. Developments in Hydrobiology, 174: pp. 69-76, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [56432]
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Artificial substrata; Colonization; Dispersion; Diurnal variations; Kelps; Laminaria hyperborea (Gunnerus) Foslie, 1884 [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Jørgensen, N.M.
  • Christie, H.C.

Abstract
    The kelp Laminaria hyperborea is host for a rich fauna of mobile invertebrates. Dispersal patterns of these animals may be crucial for their availability to visual predators like fish, which are known to search for food in these productive habitats. Diurnal, horizontal and vertical dispersal within and out of the kelp forest were studied by analysing colonization of artificial substrata placed among kelps. The species composition of the fauna was different on three parts of the kelp: lamina, stipes (with epiphytes) and holdfast. The artificial substrata were colonized mainly by species associated with kelp. More species and individuals colonized the artificial substrata at night than during the day. The most abundant faunal groups on the kelps and the artificial substrata were amphipods and gastropods. Both groups dispersed at a significantly higher rate at night than during the day. Rapid horizontal dispersal out of the kelp forest was found. The artificial substrata were also colonized quickly by kelp fauna at all vertical levels inside and above the kelp forest. However, species associated with the kelp holdfast tended to disperse close to the bottom, while stipe-associated fauna moved through all parts of the kelp forest and even above the canopy layer. A high dispersal rate appears common amongst the mobile species living on kelp and seems to be advantageous, despite the risks involved in emigrating from the habitat and being exposed to predators. Higher activity at night may reduce availability to predators.

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