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Temporal and spatial variability of mobile fauna on a submarine cliff and boulder scree complex: a community in flux
Bell, J.J.; Turner, J.R. (2003). Temporal and spatial variability of mobile fauna on a submarine cliff and boulder scree complex: a community in flux. Hydrobiologia 503: 171-182
In: Hydrobiologia. Springer: The Hague. ISSN 0018-8158, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Bell, J.J.; Turner, J.R. (2003). Temporal and spatial variability of mobile fauna on a submarine cliff and boulder scree complex: a community in flux, in: Jones, M.B. et al. (Ed.) Migrations and Dispersal of Marine Organisms: Proceedings of the 37th European Marine Biology Symposium held in Reykjavik, Iceland, 5-9 August 2002. Developments in Hydrobiology, 174: pp. 171-182, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [56455]
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Intertidal environment; Migrations; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Bell, J.J.
  • Turner, J.R.

Abstract
    The mobile component of a community inhabiting a submarine boulder scree/cliff was investigated at Lough Hyne, Ireland at dawn, midday, dusk and night over a 1-week period. Line transects (50 m) were placed in the infralittoral (6 m) and circumlittoral (18 m) zones and also the interface between these two zones (12 m). The dominant mobile fauna of this cliff consisted of echinoderms (6 species), crustaceans (10 species) and fish (23 species). A different component community was identified at each time/depth interval using Multi-Dimensional Scaling (MDS) even though both species diversity (Shannon-Wiener indices) and richness (number of species) remained constant. These changes in community composition provided indirect evidence for migration by these mobile organisms. However, little evidence was found for migration between different zones with the exception of the several wrasse species. These species were observed to spend the daytime foraging in the deeper zone, but returned to the upper zone at night presumably for protection from predators. For the majority of species, migration was considered to occur to cryptic habitats such as holes and crevices. The number of organisms declined during the night, although crustacean numbers peaked, while fish and echinoderms were most abundant during day, possibly due to predator-prey interactions. This submarine community is in a state of flux, whereby, community characteristics, including trophic and energetic relationships, varied over small temporal (daily) and spatial (m) scales.

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