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Subtle population genetic structure in the Hawaiian grouper, Epinephelus quernus (Serranidae) as revealed by mitochondrial DNA analyses
Rivera, M.A.J.; Kelley, C.D.; Roderick, G.K. (2004). Subtle population genetic structure in the Hawaiian grouper, Epinephelus quernus (Serranidae) as revealed by mitochondrial DNA analyses. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 81(3): 449-468
In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. Academic Press: London; New York. ISSN 0024-4066, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Migrations; Population growth; Population growth; Population growth; Population number; Population structure; Epinephelus quernus Seale, 1901 [WoRMS]; Serranidae Swainson, 1839 [WoRMS]; USA, Hawaii [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Rivera, M.A.J.
  • Kelley, C.D.
  • Roderick, G.K.

Abstract
    The endemic Hawaiian grouper, Epinephelus quernus, is a commercially important species experiencing intense fishing pressure in part of its distributional range. We examined population genetic structure with 398 base pairs of the mitochondrial control region across a large portion of the range of E. quernus, spanning approximately 2000 km of the Hawaiian archipelago. Examination of genetic diversity shows that Gardner Island, situated midway along the island chain, harbours the most diverse haplotypes. F-statistics and Bayesian estimates of migration also reveal the mid-archipelago as genetically differentiated, where the first significant break among adjacent pairs of populations lies between the islands of Nihoa and Necker. Most island comparisons beyond Necker and Gardner to the north-west and among the lower five islands to the south-east show little to no genetic differences. Evidence of historical population expansion across the islands was also found by Maximum Likelihood analyses. The results suggest that management should be structured to reflect the genetic differentiation and diversity in the mid-archipelago, the patterns of which may be associated with oceanic current patterns.

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