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Processes controlling import of fine-grained sediment to tidal areas: a simulation model
Bartholdy, J. (2000). Processes controlling import of fine-grained sediment to tidal areas: a simulation model, in: Pye, K. et al. (Ed.) Coastal and estuarine environments: sedimentology, geomorphology and geoarchaeology. Geological Society Special Publication, 175: pp. 13-29
In: Pye, K.; Allen, J.R.L. (Ed.) (2000). Coastal and estuarine environments: sedimentology, geomorphology and geoarchaeology Geological Society Special Publication, 175 The Geological Society: London. ISBN 1-86239-070-3. 435 pp., more
In: Hartley, A.J. et al. (Ed.) Geological Society Special Publication. Geological Society of London: Oxford; London; Edinburgh; Boston, Mass.; Carlton, Vic.. ISSN 0305-8719, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Author 
    VLIZ: Geology and Geophysics [5903]
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Marine; Brackish water

Author  Top 
  • Bartholdy, J.

Abstract
    Salt marsh and mud flat sedimentation in the Wadden Sea and in similar depositional regions is usually dependent on the net import of fine-grained sediments from adjacent marine environments. This net import takes place as a result of several processes such as settling lag and scour lag. This paper utilizes a database comprising time series of tidal velocity and turbidity in the Grådyb tidal area of western Denmark as the basis of a simple conceptual model which describes the transport, deposition and resuspension of fine-grained material in the area. The results demonstrate that: (a) grain sizes close to the sand/silt boundary are most sensitive to lag effects; (b) scour lag is much more important than settling lag; (c) raised temperatures enhance the net-lag effect for silt with increasing importance for finer grain sizes; (d) with increased suspended concentrations, the time it takes to resuspended the material deposited at slack water (the resuspension lag) is of increasing importance for the net-lag effect.

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