IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Microbial control of the culture of Artemia juveniles through preemptive colonization by selected bacterial strains
Verschuere, L.; Rombaut, G.; Huys, G.; Dhont, J.; Sorgeloos, P.; Verstraete, W. (1999). Microbial control of the culture of Artemia juveniles through preemptive colonization by selected bacterial strains, in: VLIZ Coll. Rep. 29(1999). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 29: pp. chapter 38
In: (1999). VLIZ Coll. Rep. 29(1999). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 29. Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ): Oostende, more
In: VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee: Oostende. ISSN 1376-3822, more

Also published as
  • Verschuere, L.; Rombaut, G.; Huys, G.; Dhont, J.; Sorgeloos, P.; Verstraete, W. (1999). Microbial control of the culture of Artemia juveniles through preemptive colonization by selected bacterial strains. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65(6): 2527-2533, more

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 100428 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Aquaculture; Biological control; Brine shrimp culture; Chemotaxonomy; Colonization; Feeds; Interspecific relationships; Nutrition; Polyculture; Survival; Artemia Leach, 1819 [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Verschuere, L.
  • Rombaut, G., more
  • Huys, G., more

Abstract
    The use of juvenile Artemia as feed in aquaculture and in the pet shop industry has been getting more attention during the last decade. In this study, the use of selected bacterial strains to improve the nutritional value of dry food for Artemia juveniles and to obtain control of the associated microbial community was examined. Nine bacterial strains were selected based on their positive effects on survival and/or growth of Artemia juveniles under monoxenic culture conditions, while other strains caused no significant effect, significantly lower rates of survival and/or growth, or even total mortality of the Artemia . The nine selected strains were used to preemptively colonize the culture water of Artemia juveniles. Xenic culture of Artemia under suboptimal conditions yielded better survival and/or growth rates when they were grown in the preemptively colonized culture medium than when grown in autoclaved seawater. The preemptive colonization of the culture water had a drastic influence on the microbial communities that developed in the culture water or that were associated with the Artemia , as determined with Biolog GN community-level physiological profiles. Chemotaxonomical characterization based on fatty acid methyl ester analysis of bacterial isolates recovered from the culture tanks was performed, and a comparison with the initially introduced strains was made. Finally, several modes of action for the beneficial effect of the bacterial strains are proposed.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors