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Production and application of on-grown Artemia in freshwater ornamental fish farm
Lim, L.C.; Soh, A.; Dhert, P.; Sorgeloos, P. (2001). Production and application of on-grown Artemia in freshwater ornamental fish farm, in: (2001). VLIZ Coll. Rep. 31(2001). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 31: pp. chapter 46
In: (2001). VLIZ Coll. Rep. 31(2001). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 31. Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ): Oostende, more
In: VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee: Oostende. ISSN 1376-3822, more

Also published as
  • Lim, L.C.; Soh, A.; Dhert, P.; Sorgeloos, P. (2001). Production and application of on-grown Artemia in freshwater ornamental fish farm. Aquaculture Economics and Management 5(3-4): 211-228, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 98662 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Aquaculture economics; Aquaculture techniques; Biochemical composition; Diets; Fish culture; Food organisms; Moina; Nutritive value; Ornamental fish; Artemia Leach, 1819 [WoRMS]; Marine; Fresh water

Authors  Top 
  • Lim, L.C.
  • Soh, A.
  • Dhert, P., more
  • Sorgeloos, P., more

Abstract
    This paper describes a pilot culture system for the production of on-grown Artemia in freshwater ornamental fish farms. The system had 21 culture units, each consisting essentially of three components: an oval-shaped raceway, an air-water lift system and two waste collectors. Using artificial seawater at 20 ppt for culture and at a mean production rate of 3 kg/m3 of water in a 12-day cycle, the system had a production capacity of 8 metric tons of on- grown Artemia a year. Biochemical analyses were preformed to evaluate the nutritional value of the on-grown Artemia against three conventional live feeds, viz. live Artemia nauplii, live Moina and frozen bloodworms. Cost-benefit analysis showed that with a capital investment of US$ 82,000 and an annual cost of production of US$ 81,000, the system achieved a high internal rate of return of 88% over a 10-year period and a short payback period of 1.23 years. The availability of on-grown Artemia would not only offer farmers and exporters a better alternative live food organism for feeding to their fish, but more importantly the possibility of enhancing the fish performance and quality through bioencapsulation.

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