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Energy budgets in the simultaneously hermaphroditic pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis: a trade-off between growth and reproduction during development
Koene, J.M.; Ter Maat, A. (2004). Energy budgets in the simultaneously hermaphroditic pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis: a trade-off between growth and reproduction during development. Belg. J. Zool. 134(2/1): 41-45
In: Belgian Journal of Zoology. Koninklijke Belgische Vereniging voor Dierkunde = Société royale zoologique de Belgique: Gent. ISSN 0777-6276, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Resource allocation; Resource allocation; Resource allocation; Snails; Snails; Lymnaea stagnalis (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Fresh water

Authors  Top 
  • Koene, J.M.
  • Ter Maat, A.

Abstract
    Maximum lifetime reproductive success is determined by the optimal partitioning of available resources between growth, maintenance and reproduction. The main question that is addressed here is how this resource allocation occurs in the simultaneously hermaphroditic pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis. Snails were either reared in groups or in isolation and were fed a standard, restricted amount of lettuce; group-reared snails were isolated when egg laying started. Snails reared in isolation seldom produce eggs. Instead, they increase growth rate and the energy invested in this growth corresponds to that invested in eggs by group-reared animals. Additionally, animals reared in isolation have larger prostate glands. Hence, when no mating partners are available, snails mainly invest in growth as we1l as the male function. A1location to female reproduction only starts once copulation has taken place. These findings reveal a trade-off between growth and female reproduction. Moreover, the difference in prostate glands indicates that there is also a trade-off between investment in the male and female function. The possible existence of a sexual conflict over the onset of female reproduction is discussed.

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