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Coastal biogeomorphology: an integrated approach to understanding the evolution, morphology, and sustainability of temperate coastal marshes
Reed, D.J. (2000). Coastal biogeomorphology: an integrated approach to understanding the evolution, morphology, and sustainability of temperate coastal marshes, in: Hobbie, J.E. (Ed.) Estuarine science: a synthetic approach to research and practice. pp. 347-361
In: Hobbie, J.E. (Ed.) (2000). Estuarine science: a synthetic approach to research and practice. Island Press: Washington D.C. ISBN 1-55963-700-5. XI, 539 pp., more

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    VLIZ: Aquatic Ecology [6605]

Keyword
    Marine

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  • Reed, D.J.

Abstract
    Coastal biogeomorphology considers the role of plants and animals in geomorphic processes. Biogeomorphic interactions between vegetation and sediment depositional processes are important precursors to salt-marsh initiation. Where initial vegetation colonizers show vigorous growth, a more rapid transition from intertidal to emergent marsh can occur and the processes are common across latitudes and continents. Vegetative binding of creek-bank sediments plays an important role in the equilibrium balance between erosive flows and channel-bank resistance noted in most mature coastal marshes. This recognition is crucial to the planning of functional creek systems for restored coastal wetland systems. The role of vegetation in marsh elevation change can be both a direct contribution through the accumulation of organic material within the marsh soil and an indirect contribution via its role in baffling flows across the marsh surface, thus enhancing sediment deposition. Although several models of marsh vertical development acknowledge the importance of vegetative contributions, most do not explicitly incorporate the biogeomorphic aspect of system response to sealevel rise.

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