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Étude, par émission ionique secondaire, de l'accumulation du Rubidium dans les tissus mous de l'huître Crassostrea gigas (mollusque, lamellibranche) = SIMS investigation of rubidium accumulation in the soft tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mullusca, Bivalvia)
Salaün, M.-L.; Truchet, M. (1996). Étude, par émission ionique secondaire, de l'accumulation du Rubidium dans les tissus mous de l'huître Crassostrea gigas (mollusque, lamellibranche) = SIMS investigation of rubidium accumulation in the soft tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mullusca, Bivalvia). Cah. Biol. Mar. 37(4): 329-340
In: Cahiers de Biologie Marine. Station Biologique de Roscoff: Paris. ISSN 0007-9723, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Salaün, M.-L.
  • Truchet, M.

Abstract
    When marine organisms are exposed to pollutant metals, one of the main issues to be investigated is how these metals can be recognized by the membrane transporters. The first elements of the periodic table are the alkali metals and it is well documented in vertebrates that rubidium is exchanged at a high rate with potassium, without toxicity. Our purpose was to study the effect of Rb in the human food organism Crassostrea gigas. Rubidium was added to the artificial sea water as chloride salts to replace some of the sodium ions at the concentrations of 0.3 g.l super(-l) (3.4 niM Rb super(+)), 1 g.l super(-l) (11.5 mM Rb super(+)) and 3 g.l super(-l) (34 mM Rb super(+)). Some animals were exposed to water with K instead of Rb ions. All these modifications were toxic for the animals and histological observations reveal high tissue disorganization. Ale rubidium is strongly present in all tissues, as revealed by SIMS analysis. Rubidium is widely and somewhat uniformly distributed, but some Rb accumulated in specific areas identified as polyanionic sites. Our results reveal clearly that rubidium is toxic for oysters, but this toxicity may be due mainly to the ionic modification, i.e. the replacement of Na by Rb because the same is observed when Na is replaced by K. As in Vertebrates, Rb crosses easily the membrane barrier, likely by the channels and K-pumps. But some specific bioaccumulations led us to conclude that Rb metabolism is not exactly similar to that of K.

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