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Characterization of tube proteins from the deep-sea vent worm Riftia pachyptila
Chausson, F.; Lallier, F. (1997). Characterization of tube proteins from the deep-sea vent worm Riftia pachyptila, in: Biologie des sources hydrothermales profondes = Biology of deep-sea hydrothermal vents: Journées d'échanges du Programme DORSALES = DORSALES Workshop Roscoff 6-8 octobre 1997. Cahiers de Biologie Marine, 38(2): pp. 116
In: (1997). Biologie des sources hydrothermales profondes = Biology of deep-sea hydrothermal vents: Journées d'échanges du Programme DORSALES = DORSALES Workshop Roscoff 6-8 octobre 1997. Cahiers de Biologie Marine, 38(2)[s.n.][s.l.]. 111-149 pp., more
In: Cahiers de Biologie Marine. Station Biologique de Roscoff: Paris. ISSN 0007-9723, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Chausson, F.
  • Lallier, F.

Abstract
    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment is highly hostile to life. Only organisms that have developped strong protections can thrive there. The chitino-proteinaceous tube of Riftia pachyptila is a good example of such a protection. Particular resistance properties of this structure may be due, to a rare chitin form (beta-chitin) and to a stabilizing effect of its protein matrix. Study of these proteins is the first step to understand the characteristics and the formation of this protecting tube. Proteins were extracted from tubes and analysed by SDS-PAGE. Results show that the tube of Riftia contains a complex pattern of proteins with molecular weight ranging from 5 to 200 kDa. Great variations in band intensity of electrophoretical profiles were observed in a same tube from bottom to top, from inside layers to external ones, and between animals. A comparative study was made with the tube of an other deep-sea vent worm: Tevnia jerichoana. It seems to show higher stability in electrophorical patterns than Riftia pachyptila.

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