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Ectosymbiosis between filamentous sulphur bacteria and a stalked barnacle (Scalpellomorpha, Neolepadinae) from the Lau Back Arc Basin, Tonga
Southward, A.J.; Newman, W.A. (1998). Ectosymbiosis between filamentous sulphur bacteria and a stalked barnacle (Scalpellomorpha, Neolepadinae) from the Lau Back Arc Basin, Tonga, in: (1990). Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Coastal Engineering, Delft, The Netherlands, 1990. The Dutch Coast: Paper, 4: pp. 259-262
In: (1990). Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Coastal Engineering, Delft, The Netherlands, 1990. The Dutch Coast: Paper, 4. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)[s.l.], more
In: The Dutch Coast: Paper, more

Also published as
  • Southward, A.J.; Newman, W.A. (1998). Ectosymbiosis between filamentous sulphur bacteria and a stalked barnacle (Scalpellomorpha, Neolepadinae) from the Lau Back Arc Basin, Tonga. Cah. Biol. Mar. 39(3-4): 259-262, more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Southward, A.J.
  • Newman, W.A.

Abstract
    Biologists studying barnacles abundant at hydrothermal vents in the Pacific have been on the lookout for symbiosis with sulphur bacteria, since such a mode of life is predominant in other groups of vent animals, notably tube-worms and molluscs. However, neither ectosymbionts nor endosymbionts have been seen. The neolepadine barnacles from vents have more delicate cirri and mouth parts than scalpellomorphs from surrounding deep sea and shelf regions, features that can be regarded as adaptations to feeding on fine particles, including bacteria (Newman, 1979; Jones, 1993; Newman & Yamaguchi, 1995; Southward et al., 1997; Yamaguchi & Newman, 1997a, 1997b). But there has been no hint of strategically placed ectosymbiotic bacterial growths comparable to those on the bresiliid shrimp, Rimicaris exoculata from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) (Pimenov et al., 1992; Segonzac, 1992; Segonzac et al., 1993; Gebruk et al., 1993). We now record the occurrence, in an undescribed neolepadine from the Lau Back-Arc Basin, of cirral setae that are at least twice as long as those in other vent barnacles and bear growths of filamentous bacteria. The bacteria are comparable to those found on Rimicaris at the MAR.

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