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Are kelp holdfasts islands on the ocean floor? Indication for temporarily closed aggregations of peracarid crustaceans
Thiel, M.; Vásquez, J.A. (2000). Are kelp holdfasts islands on the ocean floor? Indication for temporarily closed aggregations of peracarid crustaceans. Hydrobiologia 440(1-3): 45-54
In: Hydrobiologia. Springer: The Hague. ISSN 0018-8158, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Thiel, M.; Vásquez, J.A. (2000). Are kelp holdfasts islands on the ocean floor? Indication for temporarily closed aggregations of peracarid crustaceans, in: Jones, M.B. et al. (Ed.) Island, Ocean and Deep-Sea Biology: Proceedings of the 34th European Marine Biology Symposium, held in Ponta Delgada (Azores), Portugal, 13-17 September 1999. Developments in Hydrobiology, 152: pp. 45-54, more

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Keywords
    Benthos; Dispersion; Kelps; Reproduction; Peracarida [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Thiel, M.
  • Vásquez, J.A.

Abstract
    During the colonisation process of islands, newly immigrating species often arrive as single individuals. Islands that have received single colonisers may subsequently harbour large populations of a species, while other islands may completely lack this species. Exchange between islands is limited, thereby strongly affecting evolutionary processes. While this concept is widely used in the context of oceanic islands or habitat patches on the mainland, it is rarely used to explain and examine the distribution patterns of marine invertebrates. Benthic marine organisms inhabiting patches with island-like features may also be restricted in their movements between patches. Once established in a patch, it may be more favourable to remain there rather than moving to another patch. Juveniles of species with direct development may recruit to the island patch of their parents. Herein, we examined the peracarid fauna in patches that have island-like features, i.e. kelp holdfasts. The number of peracarid species within an individual holdfast increased with its size. Similarly, the number of individuals per holdfast increased with holdfast size. However, several peracarid species showed a strongly aggregated distribution pattern, being highly abundant in some holdfasts and almost completely absent in others. Our results suggest that these aggregations of conspecifics may be a consequence of the peracarid reproductive biology: fully developed juveniles emerge from the female's marsupium and recruit to the immediate vicinity of their mother, showing little or no tendency to emigrate towards other patches. At present, while it is not known how long peracarid aggregations within kelp holdfasts persist, our data suggest that some juveniles may remain with the natal holdfast and possibly reproduce therein. It is concluded that, during certain time periods, reproduction rates of peracarids in a holdfast may exceed their migration rates between holdfasts.

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