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A 'minimum stress inflexion' in relation to environmental and biotic influences on the dynamics of subtidal encrusting communities?
Maughan, B.C.; Barnes, D.K.A. (2000). A 'minimum stress inflexion' in relation to environmental and biotic influences on the dynamics of subtidal encrusting communities? Hydrobiologia 440(1-3): 101-109
In: Hydrobiologia. Springer: The Hague. ISSN 0018-8158, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Maughan, B.C.; Barnes, D.K.A. (2000). A 'minimum stress inflexion' in relation to environmental and biotic influences on the dynamics of subtidal encrusting communities?, in: Jones, M.B. et al. (Ed.) Island, Ocean and Deep-Sea Biology: Proceedings of the 34th European Marine Biology Symposium, held in Ponta Delgada (Azores), Portugal, 13-17 September 1999. Developments in Hydrobiology, 152: pp. 101-109, more

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Competition; Sediments; Species diversity; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Maughan, B.C.
  • Barnes, D.K.A.

Abstract
    The sedentary fauna of sublittoral boulders was studied at five sites with very different environmental conditions within Lough Hyne Marine Nature Reserve (51° 30′ N, 9° 18′ W). The degree of competition was assessed through the construction of competitive hierarchies built up from the results of nearly 3000 interactions between organisms. Communities at all sites were predominantly hierarchically organised with few stand-offs recorded. Density of interactions was correlated with total space occupation. Flow speed at all sites was logged over 24 h and this factor also correlated with space occupation. Degree of disturbance was assessed through the use of marked boulders at each site. Species diversity peaked where all factors were `moderate' and was lowest at `extreme' sites. The effects of these environmental variables and biotic factors in determining community composition are discussed, and a working model detailing a `Minimum Stress Inflexion' is described. This represents an extension of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis in that it is proposed that disturbance in this system may serve to reduce sediment load as opposed to preventing space monopolisation in the classical model.

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