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Stable isotope evidence of benthic microalgae-based growth and secondary production in the suspension feeder Cerastoderma edule (Mollusca, Bivalvia) in the Marennes-Oléron Bay
Sauriau, P.-G.; Kang, C.-K. (2000). Stable isotope evidence of benthic microalgae-based growth and secondary production in the suspension feeder Cerastoderma edule (Mollusca, Bivalvia) in the Marennes-Oléron Bay, in: Jones, M.B. et al. (Ed.) Island, Ocean and Deep-Sea Biology: Proceedings of the 34th European Marine Biology Symposium, held in Ponta Delgada (Azores), Portugal, 13-17 September 1999. Developments in Hydrobiology, 152: pp. 317-329
In: Jones, M.B. et al. (Ed.) (2000). Island, Ocean and Deep-Sea Biology: Proceedings of the 34th European Marine Biology Symposium, held in Ponta Delgada (Azores), Portugal, 13-17 September 1999. Reprinted from Hydrobiologia, 440(1-3). Developments in Hydrobiology, 152. Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht. ISBN 0-7923-6846-0. XII, 391 pp., more
In: Dumont, H.J. (Ed.) Developments in Hydrobiology. Kluwer Academic/Springer: The Hague; London; Boston; Dordrecht. ISSN 0167-8418, more

Also published as
  • Sauriau, P.-G.; Kang, C.-K. (2000). Stable isotope evidence of benthic microalgae-based growth and secondary production in the suspension feeder Cerastoderma edule (Mollusca, Bivalvia) in the Marennes-Oléron Bay. Hydrobiologia 440(1-3): 317-329, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [66275]

Keywords
    Growth; Intertidal environment; Isotopes; Phytobenthos; Ratios; Secondary production; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Sauriau, P.-G.
  • Kang, C.-K.

Abstract
    The contribution of natural food sources to the growth and secondary production of the suspension feeding bivalve Cerastoderma edule (L.) was estimated under field conditions in the Marennes-Oléron Bay (Atlantic coast, France). Monthly estimates of abundance, biomass and cockle growth were combined with seasonal analyses of δ13C and δ15N ratios of juvenile and adult cockles, together with their potential food sources [i.e. suspended particulate organic matter (POM), microphytobenthos, macroalgae and seagrass] sampled at mid-tide level in a muddy sandflat. Adult cockles grew mainly in spring, whereas juveniles grew in summer and autumn, following spat recruitment in early summer. Total annual production and elimination of cockles were estimated to be 32.5 and 34.7 g AFDW m-2 yr-1. Relative contributions of each year class to production were ca 40, 41, 11 and 6% for 0-group, 1-, 3- and 4-yr-old cockles in 1995, respectively. Quantitative assessment of proportions of food sources to the annual secondary production of cockles was obtained by using a simple carbon isotope-mixing model with microphytobenthos (δ13C = -16.0±0.6‰) and POM (δ13C = -22.2±1.1‰) as end-members. On average, more than 70% of the total annual cockle production originated from microphytobenthos, with a much higher contribution for the 0-group (88%) than for adult cockles (60%). The between-age difference was induced mainly by changes in the availability of food resources (benthic versus planktonic) during the non-synchronous growing seasons of juvenile and adult cockles.

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