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Degradation of organic matter by heterotrophic bacterial activity
Bianchi, M.; Bianchi, A.; Goutx, M.; Marty, D.; Sempéré, R.; Van Wambeke, F. (1996). Degradation of organic matter by heterotrophic bacterial activity, in: Baeyens, J. et al. (Ed.) Integrated Marine System Analysis. European Network for Integrated Marine System Analysis. FWO Vlaanderen: minutes of the first network meeting (Brugge, 29.02.96-02.03.96). pp. 142-162
In: Baeyens, J.; Dehairs, F.A.; Goeyens, L. (Ed.) (1996). Integrated Marine System Analysis. European Network for Integrated Marine System Analysis. FWO Vlaanderen: minutes of the first network meeting (Brugge, 29.02.96-02.03.96). Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Laboratorium voor Analytische Chemie: Brussel. 217 pp., more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Aquatic Ecology [7091]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Bianchi, M.
  • Bianchi, A.
  • Goutx, M.
  • Marty, D.
  • Sempéré, R.
  • Van Wambeke, F.

Abstract
    The behavior of heterotrophic bacteria is controlled by the sources of nutrients (bottom up control) as well as by their limitation by predators (top down control). Degradation of organic material by this important compartment cannot be understood without a relatively precise knowledge of the organic bulk. Thus, the determination of the role of bacteria on organic matter degradation needs complementary approaches and for each point, the involved techniques will be proposed and discussed in the full presentation. 1. Qualitative and quantitative definition of organic matter stocks, including their origin and their availability for the bacteria, in terms of (i) physical nature (particulate, colloidal, dissolved) and (ii) chemical composition (polymeric, monomeric, chemical classes). This implies analytical methods for the characterization of the organic matter. 2. Definition of bacterial parameters in terms of number, biomass, viability, trophic groups. This part will identify the bacterial compartment able to act upon the organic matter. 3. Measurement of bacterial processes implicated in the degradation of organic matter. This part concerns the main bacterial activities implicated all along the organic matter degradation, i.e. hydrolysis of macromolecules and organotrophic activity developed on products from the previous step. It also concerns the resulting production of bacterial biomass. 4. Measurement of organic matter biodegradability by experimental analysis of bacterial mineralisation processes. Natural samples (i.e. particulate and/or dissolved material of complex composition) have to be submitted to the activity of natural communities of bacteria in order to simulate the degradation processes in the specific environmental conditions. Points 1 and 2 define the two compartments in presence (organic matter and bacteria) while points 3 and 4 define the relationships between these two compartments in terms of kinetic parameters. The final goal is to be able to model the bacterial mineralisation rates and the turn over time of environmental organic matter.

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