IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Discovery of Centobnaster humesi, new genus, new species (Erebonasteridae), the most primitive poecilostomatoid copepod known, in New Caledonian deep waters
Huys, R.; Boxshall, G. (1990). Discovery of Centobnaster humesi, new genus, new species (Erebonasteridae), the most primitive poecilostomatoid copepod known, in New Caledonian deep waters. J. Crust. Biol. 10(3): 504-519

www.jstor.org/stable/1548341
In: Journal of Crustacean Biology. Crustacean Society: Washington. ISSN 0278-0372, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 266827 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Centobnaster Huys & Boxshall, 1990 [WoRMS]; Centobnaster humesi Huys & Boxshall, 1990 [WoRMS]; Cyclopoida [WoRMS]; Erebonasteridae Humes, 1987 [WoRMS]; Misophrioida [WoRMS]; Paralubbockiidae Boxshall & Huys, 1989 [WoRMS]; Poecilostomatoida [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 

Abstract
    A new genus, Centobnaster, is proposed to accommodate a single female collected from deep water northeast of New Caledonia. Centobnaster humesi, new species, is placed in the family Erebonasteridae (Poecilostomatoida) on account of the distinct palp on the mandible and the external structure of the female genital system, comprising ventral paired copulatory pores and dorsolateral gonopores. Centobnaster is considered the most primitive poecilostomatoid copepod known today because of the combined presence of 7-segmented antennules, a separate palp and unmodified gnathobase on the mandible, ventrally located paired copulatory pores, and midventral fifth legs jointed by an intercoxal sclerite. The latter character is reminiscent of primitive Misophrioida and Cyclopoida, but represents a unique plesiomorphy within the Poecilostomatoida. The Paralubbockiidae Boxshall and Huys is the only other poecilostomatoid family that has retained vestiges of ventral fifth legs. However, Paralubbockia longipedia lacks an intercoxal sclerite.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors