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Oxygen consumption and respiratory levels of juvenile shore crabs, Carcinus maenas, in relation to weight and temperature
Klein Breteler, W.C.M. (1975). Oxygen consumption and respiratory levels of juvenile shore crabs, Carcinus maenas, in relation to weight and temperature. Neth. J. Sea Res. 9(3-4): 243-254
In: Netherlands Journal of Sea Research. Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ): Groningen; Den Burg. ISSN 0077-7579, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Klein Breteler, W.C.M. (1975). Oxygen consumption and respiratory levels of juvenile shore crabs, Carcinus maenas, in relation to weight and temperature, in: Klein Breteler, W.C.M. (1976). Oecologie van de strandkrab Carcinus maenas (L.) in de westelijke Waddenzee: een serie artikelen over de rol van strandkrabben in de voedselketens op het balgzand, met speciale aandacht voor de groei, produktie, migratie en bioënergetica tijdens het eerste levensjaar. : pp. 243-254, more

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    Marine

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  • Klein Breteler, W.C.M.

Abstract
    Oxygen consumption of freshly collected juvenile Carcinus maenas has been measured at various temperatures in a continuous flow respirometer. Two levels of respiration could be distinguished; in the one the oxygen consumption fluctuated around a relatively high level (routine consumption), in the other the oxygen consumption remained very constant and relatively low (low consumption), probably as a result of ceased gill ventilation. The number of crabs showing an alternation of low and high level consumption, the frequency of the alternations, the duration of individual low level periods and the difference between the two levels, all appeared to depend on temperature. The overall oxygen consumption increased with higher temperature. Values in spring were 1.5 to 2.2 times higher than in summer and autumn when measured at the same temperature. At 20° C the unfed wild crabs consumed less oxygen than well-fed specimens which were raised in the laboratory. It is suggested that the higher oxygen consumption found by other workers may be ascribed to disturbance of the experimental animal by the measuring technique.

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