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Analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes as a tool for assessing the environmental impact of aquaculture: a case study from the western Mediterranean
Vizzini, S.; Savona, B.; Caruso, M.; Savona, A.; Mazzola, A. (2005). Analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes as a tool for assessing the environmental impact of aquaculture: a case study from the western Mediterranean. Aquacult. Int. 13(1-2): 157-165. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10499-004-9023-5
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Vizzini, S.; Savona, B.; Caruso, M.; Savona, A.; Mazzola, A. (2005). Analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes as a tool for assessing the environmental impact of aquaculture: a case study from the western Mediterranean, in: Focardi, S. et al. (Ed.) Animal welfare, human health and interactions with the environment. Aquaculture International, 13(1-2): pp. 157-165, more

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Aquaculture; Aquaculture effluents; Carbon isotope ratio; Consumers; Culture effects; Nitrogen isotopes; Primary production; Stable isotopes; MED, Western Mediterranean [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Vizzini, S.
  • Savona, B.
  • Caruso, M.
  • Savona, A.
  • Mazzola, A.

Abstract
    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (13C/12C and 15N/14 N) of in situ dominant primary producers and consumers were investigated to assess the impact on a natural ecosystem of a land-based fish farm along the south-western coast of Sicily (Italy). The putatively impacted area close to the farm along outfall was compared with other locations at increasing distances from the outfall. Carbon and mainly nitrogen stable isotopes revealed evidence of widespread aquaculture waste in the study site: benthic organisms collected in the impacted area showed more enriched d15N signatures than those at greater distances from the outfall, suggesting a large contribution of aquaculture waste to the food web. By contrast, both nekton-benthic and pelagic organisms seemed to be less influenced by discharge, probably due to their mobile habit.

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