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White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon: a non-lethal histopathological rapid diagnostic method using paraffin and frozen sections
Rajendran, K.V.; Vijayan, K.K.; Santiago, T.C.; Rajan, J.J.S. (2005). White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon: a non-lethal histopathological rapid diagnostic method using paraffin and frozen sections. Aquacult. Int. 13(4): 341-349
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Histopathology; Penaeus monodon Fabricius, 1798 [WoRMS]; India, Tamil Nadu [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Rajendran, K.V.
  • Vijayan, K.K., editor
  • Santiago, T.C.
  • Rajan, J.J.S.

Abstract
    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection was induced in tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, under laboratory conditions, and histopathological changes in subcuticular epithelial cells of the eye stalk and pleopod were studied sequentially at different time post-challenge. Routine histological techniques using paraffin embedded tissues, as well as frozen tissues, were used to document WSSV infection. Histological manifestations such as cellular hypertrophy in the subcuticular epithelial cells of the eyestalk and pleopod could be detected as early as 18 h post-infection (p.i.) before the manifestation of clinical signs of the disease. However, no histopathological changes could be detected before 18 h p.i.. Hypertrophy of the nuclei in the epithelial cells was pronounced after 24 h p.i. Marked necrosis, and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions, characteristic of early stages of WSSV infection were observed between 24–36 h p.i. Clinical signs of the disease appeared at 48 h p.i. The presence of WSSV at early asymptomatic stages of p.i. has been tested in parallel samples using polymerase chain reaction, for further confirmation of WSSV. This paper discusses the potential of a non-lethal and rapid histopathological diagnostic method to document WSSV infection, using the eyestalk or pleopod, when expensive DNA based diagnostics are not available or affordable.

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