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Mass production of competent larvae of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea)
Buitrago, E.; Lodeiros, C.; Lunar, K.; Alvarado, D.; Indorf, F.; Frontado, K.; Moreno, P.; Vasquez, Z. (2005). Mass production of competent larvae of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea). Aquacult. Int. 13(4): 359-367
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Aquaculture; Culture; Culture; Density; Larvae; Lytechinus variegatus (Lamarck, 1816) [WoRMS]; ASW, Venezuela [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Buitrago, E.
  • Lodeiros, C.
  • Lunar, K.
  • Alvarado, D.
  • Indorf, F.
  • Frontado, K.
  • Moreno, P.
  • Vasquez, Z.

Abstract
    We evaluated the mass production of competent larvae of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus cultured at three initial densities (0.25, 0.5, and 1 larvae per ml) and fed Chaetoceros muelleri. Survival, length, dry weight of larvae, and larval stage index (LSI) were estimated in each treatment as a function of the density. Density decreased during the experiment due to mortality, but the percentage was similar in all three treatments (68.5, 66.7, and 76.0%). The experiment was stopped at 13 days after fertilization, when most of the larvae were competent and had settled. There were no significant differences in survival (exceeded 65% in all treatments), length and larval stage index among treatments. However, larvae weight in the two low density treatments (1.1 ± 0.11 mg and 1.2 ± 0.05 mg, respectively) was greater than the high density treatment (0.59±0.376 mg). This study demonstrates that competent larvae of Lytechinus variegatus can be produced with less than 25% mortality in 13 days when cultures are started at densities of 0.25–1 larvae/ml. Culturing at higher densities (0.5–1 larvae/ml) had no apparent disadvantages and would reduce the cost of production.

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