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Phytoplankton pigment distributions and associated fluxes in the Bellingshausen Sea during the austral spring 1992
Barlow, R.G.; Mantoura, R.F.C.; Cummings, D.G. (1998). Phytoplankton pigment distributions and associated fluxes in the Bellingshausen Sea during the austral spring 1992. J. Mar. Syst. 17(1-4): 97-113. hdl.handle.net/10.1016/S0924-7963(98)00032-3
In: Journal of Marine Systems. Elsevier: Tokyo; Oxford; New York; Amsterdam. ISSN 0924-7963, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Barlow, R.G.; Mantoura, R.F.C.; Cummings, D.G. (1998). Phytoplankton pigment distributions and associated fluxes in the Bellingshausen Sea during the austral spring 1992, in: Le Fèvre, J. et al. (Ed.) Carbon Fluxes and Dynamic Processes in the Southern Ocean: Present and Past. Selected papers from the International JGOFS Symposium, Brest, France, 28-31 August 1995. Journal of Marine Systems, 17(1-4): pp. 97-113. hdl.handle.net/10.1016/S0924-7963(98)00032-3, more

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Keywords
    Fluxes; Fluxes; Phytoplankton; Pigments; PSW, Bellingshausen Sea; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Barlow, R.G.
  • Mantoura, R.F.C.
  • Cummings, D.G.

Abstract
    Pigment distribution patterns were investigated in the marginal ice zone of the Bellingshausen Sea and across the Drake Passage during the austral spring of November/December 1992. Elevated chlorophyll a (chl a) and fucoxanthin levels were observed at the Sub-Antarctic and Polar Fronts in the Drake Passage and at the Southern Polar Front in the Bellingshausen Sea. Investigations at 5 stations along 85°W in the Bellingshausen Sea between 70.3°S and 67.5°S revealed high concentrations of chl a (up to 24?000 ng l-1 ice melt) and fucoxanthin in hard pack ice samples and very low levels of pigments in the underlying water column (<100 ng l-1). At two ice melt stations, pigment concentrations in the ice were considerably lower and chl a in the upper mixed layer ranged from 120–250 ng l-1, with increased levels of hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin and chlorophyll b (chl b). In open water, the high chl a band at the Southern Polar Front (up to 2400 ng l-1) was associated with elevated fucoxanthin concentrations. Integrated concentrations, pigment ratios and a conversion of accessory pigments to chl a equivalents indicated that diatoms (fucoxanthin) were the most important group in the ice (>70%), although prymnesiophytes (hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin) and green algae (chl b) were present in smaller proportions. Diatoms dominated at the open water stations (>60%) and were prominent in the water column under the pack ice (52–61%). However, at the ice melt stations, prymnesiophytes (40–45%), green algae (11–13%) and, to a lesser extent, cryptophytes (4–6%; alloxanthin) collectively contributed more to the chl a biomass than the diatoms (37–42%). Budgeting the proportions of chloropigments indicated an increase in chlorophyllide a and phaeopigments from the ice to the northern open water stations, with chlorophyllide a being prominent in the upper water column and in the ice. Export fluxes of phytoplankton–carbon and phytodetritus in the upper 100 m were estimated from chloropigment inventories and residence times of Full-size image (<1 K) radionuclide reported by Shimmield et al. (1995) [Shimmield, G.B., Ritchie, G., Fileman, T.W., 1995. The impact of marginal zone processes on the distribution of Full-size image (<1 K), Full-size image (<1 K) and Full-size image (<1 K) and implications for new production in the Bellingshausen Sea Antarctica. Deep-Sea Res. II, 42 (1995) 1313–1335], revealing very low fluxes at the ice stations and up to 29 mg phyto-C m-2 day-1 at the open water high chlorophyll locality.

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