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Glacial-interglacial changes in the accumulation rates of major biogenic components in Southern Indian Ocean sediments
Bareille, G.; Labracherie, M.; Bertrand, P.; Labeyrie, L.; Lavaux, G.; Dignan, M. (1998). Glacial-interglacial changes in the accumulation rates of major biogenic components in Southern Indian Ocean sediments. J. Mar. Syst. 17(1-4): 527-539. hdl.handle.net/10.1016/S0924-7963(98)00062-1
In: Journal of Marine Systems. Elsevier: Tokyo; Oxford; New York; Amsterdam. ISSN 0924-7963, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Bareille, G.; Labracherie, M.; Bertrand, P.; Labeyrie, L.; Lavaux, G.; Dignan, M. (1998). Glacial-interglacial changes in the accumulation rates of major biogenic components in Southern Indian Ocean sediments, in: Le Fèvre, J. et al. (Ed.) Carbon Fluxes and Dynamic Processes in the Southern Ocean: Present and Past. Selected papers from the International JGOFS Symposium, Brest, France, 28-31 August 1995. Journal of Marine Systems, 17(1-4): pp. 527-539. hdl.handle.net/10.1016/S0924-7963(98)00062-1, more

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Keywords
    Accumulation; Biogenic material; Burying; Carbonates; Geological history; Glaciers; Holocene; Ice ages; Ocean bottom seismometers; Opal; Organic carbon; Palaeoceanography; Sedimentation; Uranium; ISW, South Indian Ocean [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Bareille, G.
  • Labracherie, M.
  • Bertrand, P.
  • Labeyrie, L.
  • Lavaux, G.
  • Dignan, M.

Abstract
    In this study we compare major biogenic components (opal-A, carbonate, and organic carbon) and authigenic uranium accumulation rates from the southeastern Indian Ocean for both Holocene and glacial periods. Integrated accumulation rates across the whole Indian sector of the Southern Ocean indicate that the burial of organic carbon which is held approximately constant, contrasts with lower biogenic silica and carbonate burial rates during glacial intervals. In addition, higher glacial accumulation rates of authigenic uranium are found in the sediments of the Polar Front Zone (PFZ) and the Sub-Antarctic zone (SAZ) than anywhere in the modern Southern Ocean. This suggests more reducing conditions in the PFZ and SAZ during the last glacial maximum. The simplest explanation of a northward shift of the PFZ cannot explain such changes. Glacial sediment burial changes result probably from deep water decrease in oxygen levels and increase in CO2 due to combination of two processes: (1) hydrologic changes and (2) continuous organic carbon export fluxes to the seafloor. Such shifts in chemical conditions could have enhanced the dissolution of carbonates and better preserved the organic carbon in sediments, leading in significant changes of biogenic silica/Corg and CaCO3/Corg flux ratios.

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