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Cadmium in the shore crab Carcinus maenas: seasonal variation in cadmium content and uptake and elimination of cadmium after administration via food
Bjerregaard, P.; Bjørn, L.; Nørum, U.; Pedersen, K.L. (2005). Cadmium in the shore crab Carcinus maenas: seasonal variation in cadmium content and uptake and elimination of cadmium after administration via food, in: Grosell, M. et al. (Ed.) Mechanisms in metal toxicology. Aquatic Toxicology, 72(1-2): pp. 5-15
In: Grosell, M.; Brix, K.V. (Ed.) (2005). Mechanisms in metal toxicology. Aquatic Toxicology, 72(1-2). Elsevier: Amsterdam. 3-176 pp., more
In: Aquatic Toxicology. Elsevier Science: Tokyo; New York; London; Amsterdam. ISSN 0166-445X, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Bjerregaard, P.; Bjørn, L.; Nørum, U.; Pedersen, K.L. (2005). Cadmium in the shore crab Carcinus maenas: seasonal variation in cadmium content and uptake and elimination of cadmium after administration via food. Aquat. Toxicol. 72(1-2): 5-15. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquatox.2004.11.018, more

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Keywords
    Cadmium; Seasonal variations; Carcinus maenas (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Bjerregaard, P.
  • Bjørn, L.
  • Nørum, U.
  • Pedersen, K.L.

Abstract
    The uptake and assimilation efficiency of cadmium administered via the food in the shore crab Carcinus maenas were investigated together with elimination kinetics and seasonal variations in cadmium content. The majority of shore crabs assimilated between 41 and 86% of the cadmium administered in their food. More than 90% of the cadmium taken up from food was retained in midgut gland. Elimination of cadmium after uptake from one meal of radioactively labelled soft parts of blue mussels could be described by a three-compartment model (percent109Cd-retained = 64 × e−0.001107 × t + 25 × e−0.0385 × t + 11 × e−0.888 × t). The biological half-life for cadmium in the most slowly exchanging compartment (containing 64% of the body burden) was 626 days. Groups of male and female shore crabs were collected from an uncontaminated site in the period May till October and the concentrations of cadmium in midgut gland and gills were determined. Male crabs had higher cadmium concentrations in the midgut gland in June and August (mean 2.7 μg Cd g−1 dry weight) than they had in May, September and October (mean 1.7 μg Cd g−1 dry weight). Females generally had slightly lower cadmium concentrations in the midgut gland than the males, except for a relatively high concentration in May. The cadmium concentrations in gills generally ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 μg Cd g−1 dry weight) except for male values in October (mean 1 μg Cd g−1 dry weight). Some of the seasonal changes in cadmium content of the crabs might plausibly be explained by changes in cadmium uptake from water, i.e. changes during the moult cycle and changes in cadmium uptake rates from water brought about by changes in ambient factors such as salinity and temperature. However, uptake of cadmium from water and transfer to the midgut gland take place at a rate that is two orders of magnitude too low to account for the increase in the cadmium concentrations in midgut gland in male crabs between May and June. The distribution of cadmium among tissues in crabs collected at uncontaminated sites also corresponds better with results obtained after administration of cadmium via the food than via water, and the exposure of the crabs to cadmium via the food is large enough to explain the increase in concentration between May and June.

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