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Sustainable estuary management for the 21st century
Morris, R.K.A. (2005). Sustainable estuary management for the 21st century, in: Herrier, J.-L. et al. (Ed.) (2005). Proceedings 'Dunes and Estuaries 2005': International Conference on nature restoration practices in European coastal habitats, Koksijde, Belgium 19-23 September 2005. VLIZ Special Publication, 19: pp. 569-579
In: Herrier, J.-L. et al. (Ed.) (2005). Proceedings 'Dunes and Estuaries 2005': International Conference on nature restoration practices in European coastal habitats, Koksijde, Belgium 19-23 September 2005. VLIZ Special Publication, 19. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee (VLIZ): Oostende. XIV, 685 pp., more
In: VLIZ Special Publication. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee (VLIZ): Oostende. ISSN 1377-0950, more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Canals; Mud flats; Salt marshes; Sea level changes; Sustainability; Sustainability; Sustainability; ANE, British Isles, England [gazetteer]; Marine
Author keywords
    Morphological evolutions; Sea level rise; Coastal squeeze; Flood and ebb dominance; Estuary mouth; Canalisation; Sandflats

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  • Morris, R.K.A.

Abstract
    In England, many estuaries have been effectively canalised, or so constrained that natural energy attenuation provided by saltmarsh and mudflat has been severely impaired. In this paper, it is argued that there is a need for a change in the management of estuary form, flood defence design and the maintenance of other coastal structures that influence morphological evolution. This needs a radical departure from popular thinking that existing structures should be maintained in situ. Such an approach, whilst defying the popular view of flood and coastal management, is likely to lead to sustainable form, and lower maintenance and capital investment costs in the long-term. In many cases, positive measures to widen the mouth of many estuaries will be needed and reversal of canalisation should be an objective where saltmarsh extent is too limited for effective sustainable flood management.

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