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Nutrient dynamics in a tropical mangrove ecosystem (Gazi Creek)
Kazungu, J.M. (1991). Nutrient dynamics in a tropical mangrove ecosystem (Gazi Creek), in: Delbeke, K. (Ed.) Kenya - Belgium project in marine sciences "Higher Institute for Marine Sciences" VLIR - KMFRI Project and CEC Project "Dynamics and Assessment of Kenyan Mangrove Ecosystems" No. TS2-0240-C (GDF): Progress Report November 1990 -June 1991. pp. 32-36
In: Delbeke, K. (Ed.) (1991). Kenya - Belgium project in marine sciences "Higher Institute for Marine Sciences" VLIR - KMFRI Project and CEC Project "Dynamics and Assessment of Kenyan Mangrove Ecosystems" No. TS2-0240-C (GDF): Progress Report November 1990 -June 1991. Kenyan Belgian Cooperation in Marine Sciences: Brussel. 166 pp., more

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Keywords
    Ecosystems; Mangroves; Nutrient cycles; ISW, Kenya, Gazi Creek

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  • Kazungu, J.M.

Abstract
    In order to understand the productivity of any marine or freshwater ecosystem, a study of nutrients availability and dynamics is of paramount importance. Gazi Creek which is situated about 50 km South of Mombasa Island is essentially a mangrove swamp ecosystem. Mangrove species of the type: Avicennia marina, Rhizophora mucronata, Xylocarpus granatum, Ceriops tagal and Bruguieria gymnorrhiza make up about 90% of the vegetation in the region. During low tides most parts of the creek are completely exposed and receive water only during high tides. To the north, the creek is fed by River Kidogoweni which has been established as a seasonal river. River Mkurumuji which is located to the south of the creek empties its load to the open waters next the creeks entrance. However, theory has it that some of this load is ultimately washed into Gazi Creek during high tide. If this were true, then the nutrients dynamics of Gazi Creek would actually be controlled by three sources, namely; River Kidogoweni, River Mkurumuji and the endogenic contribution mainly from bacterial decomposition of mangrove litter and seagrasses. The present study which is still in its preliminary stages focus on understanding and accessing the mangrove nutrient contribution to the ecosystem.

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